Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging modality that is commonly applied for medical applications mainly in orthodontic assessment. CBCT provides immediate and accurate two- and three-dimensional radiographic images of a solid structure. , Recently CBCT systems are relatively inexpensive and small due to: the development of compact, relatively low cost, high quality, large, flat-panel detector arrays, the availability of low cost computers with processing power sufficient for cone-beam image reconstruction and, finally, the fabrication of highly efficient X-ray tubes capable of multiple exposures. [1]. The cost reduction, toghether with the previously mentioned ability of CBCT to provide three-dimensional images and the lower emissions make its use possible in the food sector. Moreover the mechanical complexity of the cone beam tomographers is much lower than fan-beam tomographers making it possible to integrate such an apparatus in food production lines. These features contribute to the cost reduction and give the possibility to place the CBCT apparatus in convenient lead-shielded boxes that breack down X-ray emissions to negligible levels making it compatible with worker's safety.The aim of this study was to explore the potential of CBCT in food production,it was, then, decided to try CBCT for several applications in different matrices.In hard cheeses such as Pecorino and Parmigiano Reggiano it was possible to demonstrate defects of the texture, splits and the presence of air bubbles . In softer cheese CBCT was used to assess the number and volume of the bubbles inside the matrix which extremely important for cheeses characterized by propionic fermentation (Emmenthaler). In mortadella and cooked ham samples, it was possible to calculate the lean/fat ratio and regions of different density in the matrix. Some cured (whole) hams have been scanned, but the possibility to detect defects in the muscles or nearby the bone still have to be investigated.The technique is able to detect foreign bodies in all the tested matrices. Results show that the technique is very sensitive in detecting metal and high density bodies but it can also detect non metal, low density foreign bodies. (parts of plastic gloves). In conclusion, CBCT looks extremely promising for the food sector, representing a valid tool for the detection of foreign bodies undetected by conventional systems and a powerful help for product calssification.

APPLICATIONS OF CONE-BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY (CBCT) IN THE FOOD SECTOR / Ghidini, Sergio; Fortuna, Damiano; Manetti, Leonardo; Zanardi, Emanuela; Colagiorgi, Angelo; Di Ciccio, Pierluigi; Ianieri, Adriana.. - In: Atti 71 Congresso Società Italiana Scienze Veterinarie - SISvet. - ELETTRONICO. - (2017), pp. 188-188. ((Intervento presentato al convegno 71 Congresso Società Italiana Scienze Veterinarie - SISvet tenutosi a Napoli nel 28-29-30 Giugno -1 Luglio.

APPLICATIONS OF CONE-BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY (CBCT) IN THE FOOD SECTOR

GHIDINI, Sergio;ZANARDI, Emanuela;COLAGIORGI, Angelo;DI CICCIO, Pierluigi Aldo;IANIERI, Adriana
2017

Abstract

Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging modality that is commonly applied for medical applications mainly in orthodontic assessment. CBCT provides immediate and accurate two- and three-dimensional radiographic images of a solid structure. , Recently CBCT systems are relatively inexpensive and small due to: the development of compact, relatively low cost, high quality, large, flat-panel detector arrays, the availability of low cost computers with processing power sufficient for cone-beam image reconstruction and, finally, the fabrication of highly efficient X-ray tubes capable of multiple exposures. [1]. The cost reduction, toghether with the previously mentioned ability of CBCT to provide three-dimensional images and the lower emissions make its use possible in the food sector. Moreover the mechanical complexity of the cone beam tomographers is much lower than fan-beam tomographers making it possible to integrate such an apparatus in food production lines. These features contribute to the cost reduction and give the possibility to place the CBCT apparatus in convenient lead-shielded boxes that breack down X-ray emissions to negligible levels making it compatible with worker's safety.The aim of this study was to explore the potential of CBCT in food production,it was, then, decided to try CBCT for several applications in different matrices.In hard cheeses such as Pecorino and Parmigiano Reggiano it was possible to demonstrate defects of the texture, splits and the presence of air bubbles . In softer cheese CBCT was used to assess the number and volume of the bubbles inside the matrix which extremely important for cheeses characterized by propionic fermentation (Emmenthaler). In mortadella and cooked ham samples, it was possible to calculate the lean/fat ratio and regions of different density in the matrix. Some cured (whole) hams have been scanned, but the possibility to detect defects in the muscles or nearby the bone still have to be investigated.The technique is able to detect foreign bodies in all the tested matrices. Results show that the technique is very sensitive in detecting metal and high density bodies but it can also detect non metal, low density foreign bodies. (parts of plastic gloves). In conclusion, CBCT looks extremely promising for the food sector, representing a valid tool for the detection of foreign bodies undetected by conventional systems and a powerful help for product calssification.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2832441
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