The safety of food contact materials is a hot topic since chemicals can migrate from packaging into food, thus raising health concerns about and/or producing changes in the organoleptic properties of foodstuffs. Migration tests are required to demonstrate the compliance with current regulations and to investigate the transferred compounds. In this context, mass spectrometry is the analytical technique of choice for the detection and quantitation of both intentionally added substances, such as antioxidants, stabilizers, processing aids, and non-intentionally added substances (NIAS). Un-targeted strategies represent a major analytical challenge, providing a comprehensive finger-printing of the packaging material and migrating components, allowing for NIAS identification. Hyphenated mass spectrometry-based techniques have been devised for screening the presence of migrating contaminants and for quantitation purposes. Both low-resolution (LRMS) and high-resolution (HRMS) methods were screened, with a special emphasis on the latter because of its capability to directly characterize food contact materials with minimal/no sample preparation, avoiding chromatographic separation, and reducing sample handling, analysis costs, and time. Examples related to the migration of contaminants from existing or newly developed bioplastic materials will be discussed, providing an overview of the most used MS-based methods, covering the state-of-the-art approaches from 2012 up to 2022

Mass spectrometry-based techniques for the detection of non-intentionally addedd substances in bioplastics / Riboni, Nicolo'; Bianchi, Federica; Cavazza, Antonella; Piergiovanni, Maurizio; Mattarozzi, Monica; Careri, Maria. - In: SEPARATIONS. - ISSN 2297-8739. - (2023). [10.3390/separations10040222]

Mass spectrometry-based techniques for the detection of non-intentionally addedd substances in bioplastics

Nicolo' Riboni
;
Federica Bianchi
;
Antonella Cavazza;Maurizio Piergiovanni;Monica Mattarozzi;Maria Careri
2023-01-01

Abstract

The safety of food contact materials is a hot topic since chemicals can migrate from packaging into food, thus raising health concerns about and/or producing changes in the organoleptic properties of foodstuffs. Migration tests are required to demonstrate the compliance with current regulations and to investigate the transferred compounds. In this context, mass spectrometry is the analytical technique of choice for the detection and quantitation of both intentionally added substances, such as antioxidants, stabilizers, processing aids, and non-intentionally added substances (NIAS). Un-targeted strategies represent a major analytical challenge, providing a comprehensive finger-printing of the packaging material and migrating components, allowing for NIAS identification. Hyphenated mass spectrometry-based techniques have been devised for screening the presence of migrating contaminants and for quantitation purposes. Both low-resolution (LRMS) and high-resolution (HRMS) methods were screened, with a special emphasis on the latter because of its capability to directly characterize food contact materials with minimal/no sample preparation, avoiding chromatographic separation, and reducing sample handling, analysis costs, and time. Examples related to the migration of contaminants from existing or newly developed bioplastic materials will be discussed, providing an overview of the most used MS-based methods, covering the state-of-the-art approaches from 2012 up to 2022
2023
Mass spectrometry-based techniques for the detection of non-intentionally addedd substances in bioplastics / Riboni, Nicolo'; Bianchi, Federica; Cavazza, Antonella; Piergiovanni, Maurizio; Mattarozzi, Monica; Careri, Maria. - In: SEPARATIONS. - ISSN 2297-8739. - (2023). [10.3390/separations10040222]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2940471
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