In recent decades, much scientific attention has been paid to characterizing members of the genus Bifidobacterium due to their well-accepted ability to exert various beneficial effects upon their host. However, despite the well-accepted status of dogs and cats as principal companion animals of humans, the bifidobacterial communities that colonize their gut still represents a rather unexplored research area. To expand and further investigate the bifidobacterial ecosystem inhabiting the canine and feline intestine, strains belonging to this genus were isolated from fecal samples of dogs and cats and subjected to de novo sequencing. The obtained sequencing data, together with publicly available genomes of strains belonging to the same bifidobacterial species of our isolates, and of both human and animal origin, were employed for in-depth comparative genome analyses. These phylogenomic investigations highlighted a different degree of genetic variability between human- or pet-derived bifidobacteria depending on the considered species, with B. pseudocatenulatum strains of pet origin showing higher genetic variability than human-derived strains of the same bifidobacterial species. Furthermore, in silico evaluation of metabolic activities coupled with in vitro growth assays revealed the crucial role of diet in driving the genetic assembly of bifidobacteria as a result of their adaptation to the specific ecological niche they colonize. IMPORTANCE Despite cats and dogs being well recognized as the most intimate companion animals to humans, current knowledge on canine and feline gut microbial consortia is still far from being fully dissected compared to the significant advances achieved for other microbial ecosystems, such as the human gut microbiota. In this context, a combination of in silico genome-based analysis and in vitro carbohydrate growth assay allowed us to further explore the canine and feline bifidobacterial community with respect to that inhabiting the human intestine. Specifically, these data revealed how strains of different bifidobacterial species seem to have evolved a different degree of host-specific adaptation. In detail, genotypic and phenotypic evidence of how diet can be considered the main factor of this host-specific adaptation is provided.Despite cats and dogs being well recognized as the most intimate companion animals to humans, current knowledge on canine and feline gut microbial consortia is still far from being fully dissected compared to the significant advances achieved for other microbial ecosystems, such as the human gut microbiota. In this context, a combination of in silico genome-based analysis and in vitro carbohydrate growth assay allowed us to further explore the canine and feline bifidobacterial community with respect to that inhabiting the human intestine.

Disclosing the Genomic Diversity among Members of the Bifidobacterium Genus of Canine and Feline Origin with Respect to Those from Human / Alessandri, Giulia; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Tarracchini, Chiara; Rizzo, Sonia Mirjam; Argentini, Chiara; Viappiani, Alice; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Fontana, Federico; Milani, Christian; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco. - In: APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. - ISSN 1098-5336. - 88:7(2022), p. e0203821. [10.1128/aem.02038-21]

Disclosing the Genomic Diversity among Members of the Bifidobacterium Genus of Canine and Feline Origin with Respect to Those from Human

Alessandri, Giulia;Lugli, Gabriele Andrea;Tarracchini, Chiara;Rizzo, Sonia Mirjam;Argentini, Chiara;Mancabelli, Leonardo;Fontana, Federico;Milani, Christian;Turroni, Francesca;van Sinderen, Douwe;Ventura, Marco
2022-01-01

Abstract

In recent decades, much scientific attention has been paid to characterizing members of the genus Bifidobacterium due to their well-accepted ability to exert various beneficial effects upon their host. However, despite the well-accepted status of dogs and cats as principal companion animals of humans, the bifidobacterial communities that colonize their gut still represents a rather unexplored research area. To expand and further investigate the bifidobacterial ecosystem inhabiting the canine and feline intestine, strains belonging to this genus were isolated from fecal samples of dogs and cats and subjected to de novo sequencing. The obtained sequencing data, together with publicly available genomes of strains belonging to the same bifidobacterial species of our isolates, and of both human and animal origin, were employed for in-depth comparative genome analyses. These phylogenomic investigations highlighted a different degree of genetic variability between human- or pet-derived bifidobacteria depending on the considered species, with B. pseudocatenulatum strains of pet origin showing higher genetic variability than human-derived strains of the same bifidobacterial species. Furthermore, in silico evaluation of metabolic activities coupled with in vitro growth assays revealed the crucial role of diet in driving the genetic assembly of bifidobacteria as a result of their adaptation to the specific ecological niche they colonize. IMPORTANCE Despite cats and dogs being well recognized as the most intimate companion animals to humans, current knowledge on canine and feline gut microbial consortia is still far from being fully dissected compared to the significant advances achieved for other microbial ecosystems, such as the human gut microbiota. In this context, a combination of in silico genome-based analysis and in vitro carbohydrate growth assay allowed us to further explore the canine and feline bifidobacterial community with respect to that inhabiting the human intestine. Specifically, these data revealed how strains of different bifidobacterial species seem to have evolved a different degree of host-specific adaptation. In detail, genotypic and phenotypic evidence of how diet can be considered the main factor of this host-specific adaptation is provided.Despite cats and dogs being well recognized as the most intimate companion animals to humans, current knowledge on canine and feline gut microbial consortia is still far from being fully dissected compared to the significant advances achieved for other microbial ecosystems, such as the human gut microbiota. In this context, a combination of in silico genome-based analysis and in vitro carbohydrate growth assay allowed us to further explore the canine and feline bifidobacterial community with respect to that inhabiting the human intestine.
Disclosing the Genomic Diversity among Members of the Bifidobacterium Genus of Canine and Feline Origin with Respect to Those from Human / Alessandri, Giulia; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Tarracchini, Chiara; Rizzo, Sonia Mirjam; Argentini, Chiara; Viappiani, Alice; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Fontana, Federico; Milani, Christian; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco. - In: APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. - ISSN 1098-5336. - 88:7(2022), p. e0203821. [10.1128/aem.02038-21]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2929913
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