Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens are endemic throughout Europe and southern eastern regions of Asia and reported with increasing frequency in Africa. Nevertheless, the increased awareness of veterinary practitioners, even in countries where the prevalence is low, has led to a decrease D. immitis prevalence in dogs, especially in previously endemic/hyper-endemic areas. Prevalence has significantly increased, however, in areas where heartworm has apparently spread more recently, such as Central and North Eastern Europe. Furthermore, autochthonous cases have been observed in Siberia. Low seroprevalence has been reported in Croatia, while in Romania it has reached 14%. In Greece, the prevalence ranges between 0.7% and 25% whilst in Turkey is 0-18%. Data for canine dirofilariosis in Africa is scarce, and most are case reports. Overall, the dominant species is Achanthocheilonema dracunculoides, although both D. immitis and D. repens have been reported from some countries. In the Far East, the prevalence ranges from 2% to 15% in northeastern of China. In Hong Kong a novel species has been found in dogs and humans (Candidatus Dirofilaria hongkongensis). In India, the prevalence ranges from 4.7%-29.5% in Northeastern states. The main factors that have influenced the spreading of Dirofilaria infections are the climate changes and the introduction of new, invasive, competent mosquito species such as Aedes albopictus and Ae. koreicus. Other factors include relocation and insufficient prevention in dogs, manly in the new areas of colonization. Feline heartworm infection has been diagnosed in every European country when diagnosed either by the Knott test or by serology for circulating antibodies and antigens of the parasite. However, prevalence is much lower than in dogs. In spite of the continuing spreading of heartworm infection, D. repens is the main concern in Europe, mostly for physicians, while the infection is nearly always asymptomatic in dogs. The infection is spreading from Portugal to the Southeastern regions of Finland and Siberia, and in some areas its prevalence overlaps that of D. immitis. Many reasons make more difficult the control of D. repens than D. immitis: the frequent lack of clinical symptoms of suspicion, the specific diagnosis being possible only by blood examination and the inefficacy of some macrocyclic lactones.

The prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens in the Old World / Genchi, C.; Kramer, L. H.. - In: VETERINARY PARASITOLOGY. - ISSN 0304-4017. - 280:(2020), p. 108995. [10.1016/j.vetpar.2019.108995]

The prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens in the Old World

Kramer L. H.
2020-01-01

Abstract

Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens are endemic throughout Europe and southern eastern regions of Asia and reported with increasing frequency in Africa. Nevertheless, the increased awareness of veterinary practitioners, even in countries where the prevalence is low, has led to a decrease D. immitis prevalence in dogs, especially in previously endemic/hyper-endemic areas. Prevalence has significantly increased, however, in areas where heartworm has apparently spread more recently, such as Central and North Eastern Europe. Furthermore, autochthonous cases have been observed in Siberia. Low seroprevalence has been reported in Croatia, while in Romania it has reached 14%. In Greece, the prevalence ranges between 0.7% and 25% whilst in Turkey is 0-18%. Data for canine dirofilariosis in Africa is scarce, and most are case reports. Overall, the dominant species is Achanthocheilonema dracunculoides, although both D. immitis and D. repens have been reported from some countries. In the Far East, the prevalence ranges from 2% to 15% in northeastern of China. In Hong Kong a novel species has been found in dogs and humans (Candidatus Dirofilaria hongkongensis). In India, the prevalence ranges from 4.7%-29.5% in Northeastern states. The main factors that have influenced the spreading of Dirofilaria infections are the climate changes and the introduction of new, invasive, competent mosquito species such as Aedes albopictus and Ae. koreicus. Other factors include relocation and insufficient prevention in dogs, manly in the new areas of colonization. Feline heartworm infection has been diagnosed in every European country when diagnosed either by the Knott test or by serology for circulating antibodies and antigens of the parasite. However, prevalence is much lower than in dogs. In spite of the continuing spreading of heartworm infection, D. repens is the main concern in Europe, mostly for physicians, while the infection is nearly always asymptomatic in dogs. The infection is spreading from Portugal to the Southeastern regions of Finland and Siberia, and in some areas its prevalence overlaps that of D. immitis. Many reasons make more difficult the control of D. repens than D. immitis: the frequent lack of clinical symptoms of suspicion, the specific diagnosis being possible only by blood examination and the inefficacy of some macrocyclic lactones.
The prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens in the Old World / Genchi, C.; Kramer, L. H.. - In: VETERINARY PARASITOLOGY. - ISSN 0304-4017. - 280:(2020), p. 108995. [10.1016/j.vetpar.2019.108995]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2886038
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