Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in bacteria is a frequent and widespread phenomenon. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reports that multidrug resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli is considered an important hazard to public health. The lack of data on the correlation between the administration of antibiotics to pigs and the diffusion of MDR E. coli necessitates an in-depth study. The aims of our study were first of all to determine the presence of MDR and/or extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESβL) E. coli isolated from feces and carcasses of pigs; and second, to evaluate the correlation between antibiotic resistance and the antibiotic treatment administrated to the animals considered. The examined E. coli was isolated from 100 fecal swabs and 100 carcass sponges taken from farms and slaughterhouses located in Reggio Emilia province in Italy. The MDR isolates were tested following the protocol defined by EUCAST (2015). Subsequently, a real-time PCR and an endpoint-PCR were used for the genomic analysis. Data highlighted 76.5% of MDR E. coli with a marked presence of the ampicillin (AMP)-streptomycin (STRE)-tetracycline (TETRA) pattern. Moreover, 13 isolates were ESβL producers, and the blaCTXM gene was the most frequently observed in genomic analysis. Results confirm the complexity of the AMR phenomenon showing a partial correlation between the administration of antibiotics and the resistance observed. Pigs destined to the production of Protected Designation of Origin items are colonized by bacteria resistant to a wide range of antibiotic classes even if data are encouraging for colistin and third generation cephalosporin. Furthermore, in-depth study focused on food production could be useful in a view of high safety standards for consumers.

Antibiotic Treatment Administered to Pigs and Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli Isolated from Their Feces and Carcasses / Bacci, C.; Barilli, E.; Frascolla, V.; Rega, M.; Torreggiani, C.; Vismarra, A.. - In: MICROBIAL DRUG RESISTANCE. - ISSN 1076-6294. - 26:9(2020), pp. 1081-1089. [10.1089/mdr.2019.0247]

Antibiotic Treatment Administered to Pigs and Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli Isolated from Their Feces and Carcasses

Bacci C.
;
Barilli E.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Frascolla V.
Data Curation
;
Rega M.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Vismarra A.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
2020

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in bacteria is a frequent and widespread phenomenon. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reports that multidrug resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli is considered an important hazard to public health. The lack of data on the correlation between the administration of antibiotics to pigs and the diffusion of MDR E. coli necessitates an in-depth study. The aims of our study were first of all to determine the presence of MDR and/or extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESβL) E. coli isolated from feces and carcasses of pigs; and second, to evaluate the correlation between antibiotic resistance and the antibiotic treatment administrated to the animals considered. The examined E. coli was isolated from 100 fecal swabs and 100 carcass sponges taken from farms and slaughterhouses located in Reggio Emilia province in Italy. The MDR isolates were tested following the protocol defined by EUCAST (2015). Subsequently, a real-time PCR and an endpoint-PCR were used for the genomic analysis. Data highlighted 76.5% of MDR E. coli with a marked presence of the ampicillin (AMP)-streptomycin (STRE)-tetracycline (TETRA) pattern. Moreover, 13 isolates were ESβL producers, and the blaCTXM gene was the most frequently observed in genomic analysis. Results confirm the complexity of the AMR phenomenon showing a partial correlation between the administration of antibiotics and the resistance observed. Pigs destined to the production of Protected Designation of Origin items are colonized by bacteria resistant to a wide range of antibiotic classes even if data are encouraging for colistin and third generation cephalosporin. Furthermore, in-depth study focused on food production could be useful in a view of high safety standards for consumers.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2883104
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