Volunteering in emergency medical services (EMS) plays a fundamental role in the improvement and maintenance of collective and community health. However, this work often requires rescuers to deal with very stressful situations with consequences in terms of decreased quality of life and psychological well-being. The aim of this work was to analyze the resources that can be positively associated with volunteers’ quality of life. In particular, based on social identity and social cure approaches, we tested the effect of self-efficacy and identification with a volunteer category on both positive and negative aspects of the volunteers’ professional quality of life. A self-report questionnaire was administered to 203 EMS volunteers (53.7% men) from a large nonprofit volunteer association. Results are mostly supportive of predictions from the social identity (and specifically the “social cure”) approach, and show that professional identification and self-efficacy were differently linked to the dimensions of the volunteers’ quality of life. More precisely, professional identification was negatively associated with burnout and positively associated with compassion satisfaction, and both effects were mediated by self-efficacy. On the contrary, self-efficacy and volunteer identification were not associated with secondary traumatic stress. Practical implications for volunteers’ wellbeing are discussed in the light of the policies of volunteer associations to improve collective resources.

Group identification and self-efficacy associated with quality of life in emergency medical services volunteers: A cross-sectional investigation / Caricati, L.; Panari, C.; Melleri, M.. - In: JOURNAL OF APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 0021-9029. - 50:8(2020), pp. 476-488. [10.1111/jasp.12675]

Group identification and self-efficacy associated with quality of life in emergency medical services volunteers: A cross-sectional investigation

Caricati L.
;
Panari C.;
2020

Abstract

Volunteering in emergency medical services (EMS) plays a fundamental role in the improvement and maintenance of collective and community health. However, this work often requires rescuers to deal with very stressful situations with consequences in terms of decreased quality of life and psychological well-being. The aim of this work was to analyze the resources that can be positively associated with volunteers’ quality of life. In particular, based on social identity and social cure approaches, we tested the effect of self-efficacy and identification with a volunteer category on both positive and negative aspects of the volunteers’ professional quality of life. A self-report questionnaire was administered to 203 EMS volunteers (53.7% men) from a large nonprofit volunteer association. Results are mostly supportive of predictions from the social identity (and specifically the “social cure”) approach, and show that professional identification and self-efficacy were differently linked to the dimensions of the volunteers’ quality of life. More precisely, professional identification was negatively associated with burnout and positively associated with compassion satisfaction, and both effects were mediated by self-efficacy. On the contrary, self-efficacy and volunteer identification were not associated with secondary traumatic stress. Practical implications for volunteers’ wellbeing are discussed in the light of the policies of volunteer associations to improve collective resources.
Group identification and self-efficacy associated with quality of life in emergency medical services volunteers: A cross-sectional investigation / Caricati, L.; Panari, C.; Melleri, M.. - In: JOURNAL OF APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 0021-9029. - 50:8(2020), pp. 476-488. [10.1111/jasp.12675]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2879519
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