In relation to the growing attention to the quality of physical space in early childhood education and care (ECEC), the present scoping review aims to define the state of the art regarding the relationship between the physical environment of ECEC services and the psychological development of children. After 50 years of research in this field, this contribution should promote understanding of what scientific studies have achieved so far, in order to prompt useful reflections for education professionals and identify future directions of research. A systematic analysis of the psychological and educational databases has provided 88 publications on the topic. The contents of the studies identified refer to two main thematic areas: “perception of physical environment,” which includes both children’s and adults’ perceptions, and “relation between physical environment and child development,” which includes behavioral, cognitive, and emotional aspects of development. Although the studies included have used several methods and investigated different aspects of environment, systematic analysis has enabled the identification of some topics that recur among the studies, such as the significance of adults’ awareness about their perception of space, the importance of a child-centered approach, and the relevance of the participation of stakeholders in the design processes. Finally, these main findings are summarized and reflections on future conceptual and methodological orientations in the field are discussed. © 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Early Childhood Education and Care Physical Environment and Child Development: State of the art and Reflections on Future Orientations and Methodologies / Berti, S.; Cigala, A.; Sharmahd, N.. - In: EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW. - ISSN 1040-726X. - 31:4(2019), pp. 991-1021. [10.1007/s10648-019-09486-0]

Early Childhood Education and Care Physical Environment and Child Development: State of the art and Reflections on Future Orientations and Methodologies

Berti S.;Cigala A.;Sharmahd, N.
2019-01-01

Abstract

In relation to the growing attention to the quality of physical space in early childhood education and care (ECEC), the present scoping review aims to define the state of the art regarding the relationship between the physical environment of ECEC services and the psychological development of children. After 50 years of research in this field, this contribution should promote understanding of what scientific studies have achieved so far, in order to prompt useful reflections for education professionals and identify future directions of research. A systematic analysis of the psychological and educational databases has provided 88 publications on the topic. The contents of the studies identified refer to two main thematic areas: “perception of physical environment,” which includes both children’s and adults’ perceptions, and “relation between physical environment and child development,” which includes behavioral, cognitive, and emotional aspects of development. Although the studies included have used several methods and investigated different aspects of environment, systematic analysis has enabled the identification of some topics that recur among the studies, such as the significance of adults’ awareness about their perception of space, the importance of a child-centered approach, and the relevance of the participation of stakeholders in the design processes. Finally, these main findings are summarized and reflections on future conceptual and methodological orientations in the field are discussed. © 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.
Early Childhood Education and Care Physical Environment and Child Development: State of the art and Reflections on Future Orientations and Methodologies / Berti, S.; Cigala, A.; Sharmahd, N.. - In: EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW. - ISSN 1040-726X. - 31:4(2019), pp. 991-1021. [10.1007/s10648-019-09486-0]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2870693
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