Insects are a potential replacement for animal derived proteins, providing nutrient components at lower environmental impact. Despite the benefits, the population of Western countries generally reject entomophagy and consider insects disgusting. This work aims to measure the intention and behaviour of eating products containing insect flour in the next month. We focused on a chocolate biscuit with edible insect ingredient (10% of cricket flour), which might be considered as an enrich protein substitute of the traditional biscuit. The analysis was conducted on 231 Italian young consumers using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), suggesting that behaviour, given sufficient control, is guided by intention. The most relevant factor that could impede the intention of eating a product containing insect flour is, as expected, the unavailability at the supermarket, followed by the disgust factor. Interventions may consider targeting behavioural control, developing food products close to the Western culture such as energy bar and bakery products containing insect flour. The implications of this study might be useful to understand the main motivations and barriers regarding the adoption of insects as a substitute for other food products in the Western culture.

Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour in the prediction of edible insects consumption / Menozzi, Davide; Sogari, Giovanni; Simoni, Erica; Veneziani, Mario; Mora, Cristina. - ELETTRONICO. - (2016). ((Intervento presentato al convegno The changing role of regulation in the bio-based economy tenutosi a Bologna, Italy nel 16-17 June, 2016.

Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour in the prediction of edible insects consumption

MENOZZI, Davide;SOGARI, GIOVANNI;SIMONI, ERICA;VENEZIANI, Mario;MORA, Cristina
2016

Abstract

Insects are a potential replacement for animal derived proteins, providing nutrient components at lower environmental impact. Despite the benefits, the population of Western countries generally reject entomophagy and consider insects disgusting. This work aims to measure the intention and behaviour of eating products containing insect flour in the next month. We focused on a chocolate biscuit with edible insect ingredient (10% of cricket flour), which might be considered as an enrich protein substitute of the traditional biscuit. The analysis was conducted on 231 Italian young consumers using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), suggesting that behaviour, given sufficient control, is guided by intention. The most relevant factor that could impede the intention of eating a product containing insect flour is, as expected, the unavailability at the supermarket, followed by the disgust factor. Interventions may consider targeting behavioural control, developing food products close to the Western culture such as energy bar and bakery products containing insect flour. The implications of this study might be useful to understand the main motivations and barriers regarding the adoption of insects as a substitute for other food products in the Western culture.
Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour in the prediction of edible insects consumption / Menozzi, Davide; Sogari, Giovanni; Simoni, Erica; Veneziani, Mario; Mora, Cristina. - ELETTRONICO. - (2016). ((Intervento presentato al convegno The changing role of regulation in the bio-based economy tenutosi a Bologna, Italy nel 16-17 June, 2016.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2811283
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact