Background: Neuromyths are commonly held misconceptions about the brain, often generated by a misunderstanding of scientifically established facts. To date, limited research has explored the pervalence of neuromyths about neurodevelopmental disorders in the teacher population. Method: The current study investigated the prevalence of teachers' general and neurodevelopmental neuromyths among 820 Italian teachers. Results: Italian teachers correctly identified 73% of general neuromyths and 70% of neurodevelopmental neuromyths. The difference between general and neurodevelopmental neuromyths endorsement was significant. Frequency of accessing relevant information emerged as a protective factor. A mediation analysis showed that higher need for cognition was significantly associated with a higher frequency of accessing relevant information about the brain, which in turn led to lower endorsement of neuromyths. Conclusion: In line with our findings, we suggest that teachers can benefit from neuroeducation initiatives aimed to enhance neuroscience literacy in both the initial education and continuous professional development of teachers.

Neuromyths: Misconceptions about neurodevelopment by Italian teachers / Bei, Eva; Argiropoulos, Dimitris; Van Herwegen, Jo; Incognito, Oriana; Menichetti, Laura; Tarchi, Christian; Pecini, Chiara. - In: TRENDS IN NEUROSCIENCE AND EDUCATION. - ISSN 2211-9493. - 34:(2024), pp. 100219.1-100219.12. [10.1016/j.tine.2023.100219]

Neuromyths: Misconceptions about neurodevelopment by Italian teachers

Argiropoulos, Dimitris;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Background: Neuromyths are commonly held misconceptions about the brain, often generated by a misunderstanding of scientifically established facts. To date, limited research has explored the pervalence of neuromyths about neurodevelopmental disorders in the teacher population. Method: The current study investigated the prevalence of teachers' general and neurodevelopmental neuromyths among 820 Italian teachers. Results: Italian teachers correctly identified 73% of general neuromyths and 70% of neurodevelopmental neuromyths. The difference between general and neurodevelopmental neuromyths endorsement was significant. Frequency of accessing relevant information emerged as a protective factor. A mediation analysis showed that higher need for cognition was significantly associated with a higher frequency of accessing relevant information about the brain, which in turn led to lower endorsement of neuromyths. Conclusion: In line with our findings, we suggest that teachers can benefit from neuroeducation initiatives aimed to enhance neuroscience literacy in both the initial education and continuous professional development of teachers.
2024
Neuromyths: Misconceptions about neurodevelopment by Italian teachers / Bei, Eva; Argiropoulos, Dimitris; Van Herwegen, Jo; Incognito, Oriana; Menichetti, Laura; Tarchi, Christian; Pecini, Chiara. - In: TRENDS IN NEUROSCIENCE AND EDUCATION. - ISSN 2211-9493. - 34:(2024), pp. 100219.1-100219.12. [10.1016/j.tine.2023.100219]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2971092
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