The brown marmorated stink bug Halyomorpha halys is an Asian species that has become a major agricultural pest in North America and Europe. Ants from the genus Crematogaster are predators of H. halys nymphs in Asia, as well as in the Mediterranean, where known native predators are still few. At the same time, ants usually do not harm H. halys eggs, which are the target of the main biological control agents, the scelionid parasitoids of the genus Trissolcus. However, ants, as generalist predators and territorial organisms, may kill or displace a variety of other insects, potentially interfering with parasitoids and biological control programmes. We conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the interactions between the Mediterranean ant Crematogaster scutellaris and the parasitoids T. japonicus and T. mitsukurii, evaluating the possibility that the ants could damage the parasitized eggs, attack the parasitoids during emergence or interfere with the egg-laying behaviour of female parasitoids. Our results demonstrate that C. scutellaris is not able to damage parasitized eggs and is not aggressive towards adult parasitoids at any stage. The presence of ants can slow down the parasitization rate in T. mitsukurii females in the smallest laboratory setups; however, this has not been observed in a more natural setting. We suggest that ants may play a complementary role together with egg-parasitoids in the control of H. halys without interfering with each other.

Interactions between egg parasitoids and predatory ants for the biocontrol of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug Halyomorpha halys / Schifani, E; Giannetti, D; Costi, E; Franconi, G; Campostrini, A; Maistrello, L; Grasso, Da. - In: JOURNAL OF APPLIED ENTOMOLOGY. - ISSN 0931-2048. - 147:9(2023), pp. 868-874. [10.1111/jen.13179]

Interactions between egg parasitoids and predatory ants for the biocontrol of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug Halyomorpha halys

Schifani, E
;
Giannetti, D;Grasso, DA
2023-01-01

Abstract

The brown marmorated stink bug Halyomorpha halys is an Asian species that has become a major agricultural pest in North America and Europe. Ants from the genus Crematogaster are predators of H. halys nymphs in Asia, as well as in the Mediterranean, where known native predators are still few. At the same time, ants usually do not harm H. halys eggs, which are the target of the main biological control agents, the scelionid parasitoids of the genus Trissolcus. However, ants, as generalist predators and territorial organisms, may kill or displace a variety of other insects, potentially interfering with parasitoids and biological control programmes. We conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the interactions between the Mediterranean ant Crematogaster scutellaris and the parasitoids T. japonicus and T. mitsukurii, evaluating the possibility that the ants could damage the parasitized eggs, attack the parasitoids during emergence or interfere with the egg-laying behaviour of female parasitoids. Our results demonstrate that C. scutellaris is not able to damage parasitized eggs and is not aggressive towards adult parasitoids at any stage. The presence of ants can slow down the parasitization rate in T. mitsukurii females in the smallest laboratory setups; however, this has not been observed in a more natural setting. We suggest that ants may play a complementary role together with egg-parasitoids in the control of H. halys without interfering with each other.
2023
Interactions between egg parasitoids and predatory ants for the biocontrol of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug Halyomorpha halys / Schifani, E; Giannetti, D; Costi, E; Franconi, G; Campostrini, A; Maistrello, L; Grasso, Da. - In: JOURNAL OF APPLIED ENTOMOLOGY. - ISSN 0931-2048. - 147:9(2023), pp. 868-874. [10.1111/jen.13179]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2965135
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