Immigrants from outside Europe have increased over the past two decades, especially in Southern European countries including Italy. This influx coincided with an increased number of immigrants with end-stage organ diseases. In this narrative review, we reviewed evidence of the gaps between native-born and immigrant populations in the Organ Donation and Transplantation (ODT) process in Italy. Consistent with prior studies, despite the availability of a publicly funded health system with universal healthcare coverage, non-European-born individuals living in Italy are less likely to receive living donor kidney transplantation and more likely to have inferior long-term kidney graft function compared with EU-born and Eastern European-born individuals. While these patients are increasingly represented among transplant recipients (especially kidney and liver transplants), refusal rates for organ donation are higher in some ethnic groups compared with native-born and other foreign-born referents, with the potential downstream effects of prolonged waiting times and inferior transplant outcomes. In the process, we identified gaps in relevant research and biases in existing studies. Given the Italian National Transplant Center’s (CNT) commitment to fighting inequities in ODT, we illustrated actions taken by CNT to tackle inequities in ODT among immigrant communities in Italy.

Inequities in Organ Donation and Transplantation Among Immigrant Populations in Italy: A Narrative Review of Evidence, Gaps in Research and Potential Areas for Intervention / Grossi, A. A.; Puoti, F.; Masiero, L.; Troni, A.; Cianchi, T.; Maggiore, U.; Cardillo, M.. - In: TRANSPLANT INTERNATIONAL. - ISSN 0934-0874. - 36:(2023), p. 11216.11216. [10.3389/ti.2023.11216]

Inequities in Organ Donation and Transplantation Among Immigrant Populations in Italy: A Narrative Review of Evidence, Gaps in Research and Potential Areas for Intervention

Troni A.;Maggiore U.;Cardillo M.
2023-01-01

Abstract

Immigrants from outside Europe have increased over the past two decades, especially in Southern European countries including Italy. This influx coincided with an increased number of immigrants with end-stage organ diseases. In this narrative review, we reviewed evidence of the gaps between native-born and immigrant populations in the Organ Donation and Transplantation (ODT) process in Italy. Consistent with prior studies, despite the availability of a publicly funded health system with universal healthcare coverage, non-European-born individuals living in Italy are less likely to receive living donor kidney transplantation and more likely to have inferior long-term kidney graft function compared with EU-born and Eastern European-born individuals. While these patients are increasingly represented among transplant recipients (especially kidney and liver transplants), refusal rates for organ donation are higher in some ethnic groups compared with native-born and other foreign-born referents, with the potential downstream effects of prolonged waiting times and inferior transplant outcomes. In the process, we identified gaps in relevant research and biases in existing studies. Given the Italian National Transplant Center’s (CNT) commitment to fighting inequities in ODT, we illustrated actions taken by CNT to tackle inequities in ODT among immigrant communities in Italy.
2023
Inequities in Organ Donation and Transplantation Among Immigrant Populations in Italy: A Narrative Review of Evidence, Gaps in Research and Potential Areas for Intervention / Grossi, A. A.; Puoti, F.; Masiero, L.; Troni, A.; Cianchi, T.; Maggiore, U.; Cardillo, M.. - In: TRANSPLANT INTERNATIONAL. - ISSN 0934-0874. - 36:(2023), p. 11216.11216. [10.3389/ti.2023.11216]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2963353
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 5
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 4
social impact