: Articular cartilage degradation due to injury, disease and aging is a common clinical issue as current regenerative therapies are unable to fully replicate the complex microenvironment of the native tissue which, being avascular, is featured by very low ability to self-regenerate. The extracellular matrix (ECM), constituting almost 90% of the entire tissue, plays a critical role in its function and resistance to compressive forces. In this context, the current tissue engineering strategies are only partially effective in restoring the biology and function of the native tissue. A main issue in tissue regeneration is treatment failure due to scarce integration of the engineered construct, often following a gradual detachment of the graft. In this scenario, we aimed to create an adhesive patch able to adequately support cartilage regeneration as a promising tool for the treatment of cartilage injuries and diseases. For this, we produced an engineered construct composed of decellularized ECM (dECM) obtained from horse joint cartilage, to support tissue regeneration, coupled with a Silk-Elastin-Like Proteins (SELP) hydrogel, which acts as a biological glue, to guarantee an adequate adherence to the host tissue. Following the production of the two biomaterials we characterized them by assessing: 1) dECM morphological, chemical, and ultrastructural features along with its capability to support chondrocyte proliferation, specific marker expression and ECM synthesis; 2) SELP microarchitecture, cytocompatibility and mechanical properties. Our results demonstrated that both materials hold unique properties suitable to be exploited to produce a tailored microenvironment to support cell growth and differentiation providing a proof of concept concerning the in vitro biological and mechanical efficacy of the construct. The SELP hydrogel displayed a very interesting physical behavior due to its high degree of resistance to mechanical stress, which is generally associated with physiological mechanical load during locomotion. Intriguingly, the shear-thinning behavior of the hydrogel may also make it suitable to be applied and spread over non-homogeneous surfaces, therefore, we hypothesize that the hybrid biomaterial proposed may be a real asset in the treatment of cartilage defects and injuries.

Biomimetic approach for an articular cartilage patch: combination of decellularized cartilage matrix and silk-elastin-like-protein (SELP) hydrogel / Ravanetti, F; Borghetti, P; Zoboli, M; Veloso, P M; Angelis, E De; Ciccimarra, R; Saleri, R; Cacchioli, A; Gazza, F; Machado, R; Ragionieri, L; Attanasio, C. - In: ANNALS OF ANATOMY. - ISSN 0940-9602. - 250:(2023), p. 152144. [10.1016/j.aanat.2023.152144]

Biomimetic approach for an articular cartilage patch: combination of decellularized cartilage matrix and silk-elastin-like-protein (SELP) hydrogel

Ravanetti, F;Borghetti, P;Zoboli, M
;
Angelis, E De;Ciccimarra, R;Saleri, R;Cacchioli, A;Gazza, F;Ragionieri, L;
2023-01-01

Abstract

: Articular cartilage degradation due to injury, disease and aging is a common clinical issue as current regenerative therapies are unable to fully replicate the complex microenvironment of the native tissue which, being avascular, is featured by very low ability to self-regenerate. The extracellular matrix (ECM), constituting almost 90% of the entire tissue, plays a critical role in its function and resistance to compressive forces. In this context, the current tissue engineering strategies are only partially effective in restoring the biology and function of the native tissue. A main issue in tissue regeneration is treatment failure due to scarce integration of the engineered construct, often following a gradual detachment of the graft. In this scenario, we aimed to create an adhesive patch able to adequately support cartilage regeneration as a promising tool for the treatment of cartilage injuries and diseases. For this, we produced an engineered construct composed of decellularized ECM (dECM) obtained from horse joint cartilage, to support tissue regeneration, coupled with a Silk-Elastin-Like Proteins (SELP) hydrogel, which acts as a biological glue, to guarantee an adequate adherence to the host tissue. Following the production of the two biomaterials we characterized them by assessing: 1) dECM morphological, chemical, and ultrastructural features along with its capability to support chondrocyte proliferation, specific marker expression and ECM synthesis; 2) SELP microarchitecture, cytocompatibility and mechanical properties. Our results demonstrated that both materials hold unique properties suitable to be exploited to produce a tailored microenvironment to support cell growth and differentiation providing a proof of concept concerning the in vitro biological and mechanical efficacy of the construct. The SELP hydrogel displayed a very interesting physical behavior due to its high degree of resistance to mechanical stress, which is generally associated with physiological mechanical load during locomotion. Intriguingly, the shear-thinning behavior of the hydrogel may also make it suitable to be applied and spread over non-homogeneous surfaces, therefore, we hypothesize that the hybrid biomaterial proposed may be a real asset in the treatment of cartilage defects and injuries.
2023
Biomimetic approach for an articular cartilage patch: combination of decellularized cartilage matrix and silk-elastin-like-protein (SELP) hydrogel / Ravanetti, F; Borghetti, P; Zoboli, M; Veloso, P M; Angelis, E De; Ciccimarra, R; Saleri, R; Cacchioli, A; Gazza, F; Machado, R; Ragionieri, L; Attanasio, C. - In: ANNALS OF ANATOMY. - ISSN 0940-9602. - 250:(2023), p. 152144. [10.1016/j.aanat.2023.152144]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2957072
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