The ubiquitous commensal Candida albicans, part of the human microbiota, is an opportunistic pathogen able to cause a wide range of diseases, from cutaneous mycoses to life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. Candida albicans adapts to different environments and survives long-time starvation. The ability to switch from yeast to hyphal morphology under specific environmental conditions is associated with its virulence. Using hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we profiled the intracellular and extracellular metabolome of C. albicans kept in water, yeast extract–peptone–dextrose (YPD), and M199 media, at selected temperatures. Experiments were carried out in hypoxia to mimic a condition present in most colonized niches and fungal infection sites. Comparison of the intracellular metabolites measured in YPD and M199 at 37 °C highlighted differences in specific metabolic pathways: (i) alanine, aspartate, glutamate metabolism, (ii) arginine and proline metabolism, (iii) glycerolipid metabolism, attributable to the diverse composition of the media. Moreover, we hypothesized that the subtle differences in the M199 metabolome, observed at 30 °C and 37 °C, are suggestive of modifications propaedeutic to a subsequent transition from yeast to hyphal form. The analysis of the metabolites’ profiles of C. albicans allows envisaging a molecular model to better describe its ability to sense and adapt to environmental conditions.

Metabolic Plasticity of Candida albicans in Response to Different Environmental Conditions / Gallo, M.; Giovati, L.; Magliani, W.; Pertinhez, T. A.; Conti, S.; Ferrari, E.; Spisni, A.; Ciociola, T.. - In: JOURNAL OF FUNGI. - ISSN 2309-608X. - 8:7(2022), p. 723.723. [10.3390/jof8070723]

Metabolic Plasticity of Candida albicans in Response to Different Environmental Conditions

Gallo M.
Investigation
;
Giovati L.
Resources
;
Magliani W.
Supervision
;
Pertinhez T. A.
Conceptualization
;
Conti S.
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Ferrari E.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Spisni A.
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Ciociola T.
Investigation
2022-01-01

Abstract

The ubiquitous commensal Candida albicans, part of the human microbiota, is an opportunistic pathogen able to cause a wide range of diseases, from cutaneous mycoses to life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. Candida albicans adapts to different environments and survives long-time starvation. The ability to switch from yeast to hyphal morphology under specific environmental conditions is associated with its virulence. Using hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we profiled the intracellular and extracellular metabolome of C. albicans kept in water, yeast extract–peptone–dextrose (YPD), and M199 media, at selected temperatures. Experiments were carried out in hypoxia to mimic a condition present in most colonized niches and fungal infection sites. Comparison of the intracellular metabolites measured in YPD and M199 at 37 °C highlighted differences in specific metabolic pathways: (i) alanine, aspartate, glutamate metabolism, (ii) arginine and proline metabolism, (iii) glycerolipid metabolism, attributable to the diverse composition of the media. Moreover, we hypothesized that the subtle differences in the M199 metabolome, observed at 30 °C and 37 °C, are suggestive of modifications propaedeutic to a subsequent transition from yeast to hyphal form. The analysis of the metabolites’ profiles of C. albicans allows envisaging a molecular model to better describe its ability to sense and adapt to environmental conditions.
Metabolic Plasticity of Candida albicans in Response to Different Environmental Conditions / Gallo, M.; Giovati, L.; Magliani, W.; Pertinhez, T. A.; Conti, S.; Ferrari, E.; Spisni, A.; Ciociola, T.. - In: JOURNAL OF FUNGI. - ISSN 2309-608X. - 8:7(2022), p. 723.723. [10.3390/jof8070723]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2928931
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