In the present study we investigated the infuence of positive and negative arousal situations and the presence of an audience on dogs’ behavioural displays and facial expressions. We exposed dogs to positive anticipation, non-social frustration and social frustration evoking test sessions and measured pre and post-test salivary cortisol concentrations. Cortisol concentration did not increase during the tests and there was no diference in pre or post-test concentrations in the diferent test conditions, excluding a diferent level of arousal. Displacement behaviours of “looking away” and “snifng the environment” occurred more in the frustration-evoking situations compared to the positive anticipation and were correlated with cortisol concentrations. “Ears forward” occurred more in the positive anticipation condition compared to the frustration-evoking conditions, was positively infuenced by the presence of an audience, and negatively correlated to the pre-test cortisol concentrations, suggesting it may be a good indicator of dogs’ level of attention. “Ears fattener”, “blink”, “nose lick”, “tail wagging” and “whining” were associated with the presence of an audience but were not correlated to cortisol concentrations, suggesting a communicative component of these visual displays. These fndings are a frst step to systematically test which subtle cues could be considered communicative signals in domestic dogs.

Audience effect on domestic dogs’ behavioural displays and facial expressions / Pedretti, Giulia; Canori, Chiara; Marshall‑pescini, Sarah; Palme, Rupert; Pelosi, Annalisa; Valsecchi, Paola Maria. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 12:(2022), pp. 9747.1-9747.13. [10.1038/s41598-022-13566-7]

Audience effect on domestic dogs’ behavioural displays and facial expressions

Giulia Pedretti
Conceptualization
;
Annalisa Pelosi
Formal Analysis
;
Paola Valsecchi
Writing – Review & Editing
2022

Abstract

In the present study we investigated the infuence of positive and negative arousal situations and the presence of an audience on dogs’ behavioural displays and facial expressions. We exposed dogs to positive anticipation, non-social frustration and social frustration evoking test sessions and measured pre and post-test salivary cortisol concentrations. Cortisol concentration did not increase during the tests and there was no diference in pre or post-test concentrations in the diferent test conditions, excluding a diferent level of arousal. Displacement behaviours of “looking away” and “snifng the environment” occurred more in the frustration-evoking situations compared to the positive anticipation and were correlated with cortisol concentrations. “Ears forward” occurred more in the positive anticipation condition compared to the frustration-evoking conditions, was positively infuenced by the presence of an audience, and negatively correlated to the pre-test cortisol concentrations, suggesting it may be a good indicator of dogs’ level of attention. “Ears fattener”, “blink”, “nose lick”, “tail wagging” and “whining” were associated with the presence of an audience but were not correlated to cortisol concentrations, suggesting a communicative component of these visual displays. These fndings are a frst step to systematically test which subtle cues could be considered communicative signals in domestic dogs.
Audience effect on domestic dogs’ behavioural displays and facial expressions / Pedretti, Giulia; Canori, Chiara; Marshall‑pescini, Sarah; Palme, Rupert; Pelosi, Annalisa; Valsecchi, Paola Maria. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 12:(2022), pp. 9747.1-9747.13. [10.1038/s41598-022-13566-7]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2926792
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