In the last decades, the contribution of cognitive neuroscience to film studies has been invested in at least three different lines of research. The first one has to do with film theory and history: the new attention, inspired by cognitive neuroscience, to the viewer’s brain-body, the senso- rimotor basis of film cognition, and the forms of embodied simulation elic- ited by the cinematic experience has stimulated a profound rethinking of a relevant part of the theoretical discourse on cinema, from the very begin- ning of the twentieth century to the most recent reflections within cognitive film studies and the phenomenology of film. The second line has to do with the intersubjective relationship between the movie—its style, rhythm, characters, and narrative—and the viewer, and it is characterized by an empirical approach that yields very interesting results, useful for rethinking and problematizing our ideas about editing, camera movements, and film reception. The third line concerns a possible experimental approach to the new life of film, focusing on the digital image, the innovative forms of tech- nological mediation, and the inscription of a new film spectatorship within a completely different medial frame. The goal of this special issue is to offer insights across these lines of research.

The Neuroscience of Film / Gallese, Vittorio; Guerra, Michele. - In: PROJECTIONS. - ISSN 1934-9688. - 16:1(2022), pp. 1-10. [10.3167/proj.2022.160101]

The Neuroscience of Film

Gallese, Vittorio;Guerra, Michele
2022

Abstract

In the last decades, the contribution of cognitive neuroscience to film studies has been invested in at least three different lines of research. The first one has to do with film theory and history: the new attention, inspired by cognitive neuroscience, to the viewer’s brain-body, the senso- rimotor basis of film cognition, and the forms of embodied simulation elic- ited by the cinematic experience has stimulated a profound rethinking of a relevant part of the theoretical discourse on cinema, from the very begin- ning of the twentieth century to the most recent reflections within cognitive film studies and the phenomenology of film. The second line has to do with the intersubjective relationship between the movie—its style, rhythm, characters, and narrative—and the viewer, and it is characterized by an empirical approach that yields very interesting results, useful for rethinking and problematizing our ideas about editing, camera movements, and film reception. The third line concerns a possible experimental approach to the new life of film, focusing on the digital image, the innovative forms of tech- nological mediation, and the inscription of a new film spectatorship within a completely different medial frame. The goal of this special issue is to offer insights across these lines of research.
The Neuroscience of Film / Gallese, Vittorio; Guerra, Michele. - In: PROJECTIONS. - ISSN 1934-9688. - 16:1(2022), pp. 1-10. [10.3167/proj.2022.160101]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2921488
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