Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) are more frequent among men, but women (especially those aged < 40 years) have experienced steeper growth in their incidence rates in recent years. Hormonal factors were hypothesized to be playing a role in modulating NMSC risk, but the studies published to date provided conflicting results. We systematically reviewed and meta-analysed the studies focusing on the association between hormone-related characteristics (use of exogenous sex hormones, and aspects of menstrual and reproductive history) and the risk of NMSC among women. We included observational and experimental studies published in PubMed and EMBASE until February 2020. We calculated summary relative risk (SRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) by applying random effects models with maximum likelihood estimation, and used the I2 statistics to quantify the degree of heterogeneity of risk estimates across studies. Eleven independent studies encompassing a total of over 30,000 NMSC cases were included in quantitative analyses. No evidence of an increased NMSC risk emerged among ever vs. never users of oral contraceptives (SRR 1.13, 95% CI 0.88–1.45) or hormones for menopause (SRR 1.09, 95% CI 0.87–1.37). Likewise, age at menarche or at menopause and parity were not associated with NMSC risk. Heterogeneity across studies was low, and pooled results were comparable between NMSC subtypes. We found no evidence that hormonal factors play a role in the pathogenesis of NMSC among women.

Exogenous sex hormones, menstrual and reproductive history, and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer among women: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis / Caini, S.; De Angelis, S. P.; Corso, F.; Fantini, C.; Raimondi, S.; Pala, L.; Stanganelli, I.; de Giorgi, V.; Gandini, S.. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 11:1(2021), p. 8524.8524. [10.1038/s41598-021-88077-y]

Exogenous sex hormones, menstrual and reproductive history, and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer among women: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis

Stanganelli I.;
2021

Abstract

Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) are more frequent among men, but women (especially those aged < 40 years) have experienced steeper growth in their incidence rates in recent years. Hormonal factors were hypothesized to be playing a role in modulating NMSC risk, but the studies published to date provided conflicting results. We systematically reviewed and meta-analysed the studies focusing on the association between hormone-related characteristics (use of exogenous sex hormones, and aspects of menstrual and reproductive history) and the risk of NMSC among women. We included observational and experimental studies published in PubMed and EMBASE until February 2020. We calculated summary relative risk (SRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) by applying random effects models with maximum likelihood estimation, and used the I2 statistics to quantify the degree of heterogeneity of risk estimates across studies. Eleven independent studies encompassing a total of over 30,000 NMSC cases were included in quantitative analyses. No evidence of an increased NMSC risk emerged among ever vs. never users of oral contraceptives (SRR 1.13, 95% CI 0.88–1.45) or hormones for menopause (SRR 1.09, 95% CI 0.87–1.37). Likewise, age at menarche or at menopause and parity were not associated with NMSC risk. Heterogeneity across studies was low, and pooled results were comparable between NMSC subtypes. We found no evidence that hormonal factors play a role in the pathogenesis of NMSC among women.
Exogenous sex hormones, menstrual and reproductive history, and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer among women: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis / Caini, S.; De Angelis, S. P.; Corso, F.; Fantini, C.; Raimondi, S.; Pala, L.; Stanganelli, I.; de Giorgi, V.; Gandini, S.. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 11:1(2021), p. 8524.8524. [10.1038/s41598-021-88077-y]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2914626
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