PURPOSE: A possible relationship between sleep bruxism (SB) and several sleep disorders has been suggested in children, which could influence sleep quality and quality of life. This study aims to assess such correlations in a large sample of school children. METHODS: Parents of 741 consecutive children aged between 8 and 12 years filled the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC). It evaluated 45 items grouped in 8 components: duration of night-time sleep, sleep latency, bedtime problems, sleep quality, night awakenings, noc-turnal symptoms, morning symptoms and daytime sleepiness. An item evaluating parental-reported tooth grinding was also included. Correlation analysis was performed between paren-tal-reported tooth grinding and all the other items. RESULTS: A significant correlation between parental-reported tooth grinding and several sleep disorders concerning bedtime problems, night awakenings, nocturnal symptoms, and morning symptoms has been found. In general, correlation strength of significant pairs was low, ranging from .092 (sleep apnea) to .234 (movement while falling asleep). CONCLUSIONS: Parental-reported tooth grinding in children is correlated, even if weakly, with some sleep disorders concerning the sphere of bedtime problems, night awakenings, noc-turnal symptoms, breathing symptoms and morning symptoms. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings, with particular regard to the consistency of correlation outcomes between the parental reports and the sleep laboratory measures.

Correlation Between Parental-Reported Tooth Grinding and Sleep Disorders: Investigation in a Cohort of 741 Consecutive Children / Segu', M; Pollis, M; Santagostini A., Meola F; Manfredini, D. - In: PAIN RESEARCH & MANAGEMENT. - ISSN 1203-6765. - (2020). [DOI: 10.1155/7040]

Correlation Between Parental-Reported Tooth Grinding and Sleep Disorders: Investigation in a Cohort of 741 Consecutive Children

SEGU' M;
2020

Abstract

PURPOSE: A possible relationship between sleep bruxism (SB) and several sleep disorders has been suggested in children, which could influence sleep quality and quality of life. This study aims to assess such correlations in a large sample of school children. METHODS: Parents of 741 consecutive children aged between 8 and 12 years filled the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC). It evaluated 45 items grouped in 8 components: duration of night-time sleep, sleep latency, bedtime problems, sleep quality, night awakenings, noc-turnal symptoms, morning symptoms and daytime sleepiness. An item evaluating parental-reported tooth grinding was also included. Correlation analysis was performed between paren-tal-reported tooth grinding and all the other items. RESULTS: A significant correlation between parental-reported tooth grinding and several sleep disorders concerning bedtime problems, night awakenings, nocturnal symptoms, and morning symptoms has been found. In general, correlation strength of significant pairs was low, ranging from .092 (sleep apnea) to .234 (movement while falling asleep). CONCLUSIONS: Parental-reported tooth grinding in children is correlated, even if weakly, with some sleep disorders concerning the sphere of bedtime problems, night awakenings, noc-turnal symptoms, breathing symptoms and morning symptoms. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings, with particular regard to the consistency of correlation outcomes between the parental reports and the sleep laboratory measures.
Correlation Between Parental-Reported Tooth Grinding and Sleep Disorders: Investigation in a Cohort of 741 Consecutive Children / Segu', M; Pollis, M; Santagostini A., Meola F; Manfredini, D. - In: PAIN RESEARCH & MANAGEMENT. - ISSN 1203-6765. - (2020). [DOI: 10.1155/7040]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2910797
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