Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the neurobiology of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Post-mortem studies are an important step and could help to comprehend not only the progression of motor symptoms, but also the involvement of other clinical domains, including cognition, behavior and impulse control disorders (ICDs). The correlation of neuropathological extension of the disease with the clinical stages remains challenging. Molecular imaging, including positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon computed tomography (SPECT), could allow for bridging the gap by providing in vivo evidence of disease extension. In the last decade, we have observed a plethora of reports describing improvements in the sensitivity of neuroimaging techniques. These data contribute to increasing the accuracy of PD diagnosis, differentiating PD from other causes of parkinsonism and also obtaining a surrogate marker of disease progression. FDG-PET has been used to measure cerebral metabolic rates of glucose, a proxy for neuronal activity, in PD. Many studies have shown that this technique could be used in early PD, where reduced metabolic activity correlates with disease progression and could predict histopathological diagnosis. The aim of this work is to report two particular cases of PD in which the assessment of brain metabolic activity (from FDG-PET) has been combined with clinical aspects of non-motor symptoms. Integration of information on neuropsychological and metabolic imaging allows us to improve the treatment of PD patients irrespective of age.

Cognitive and behavior deficits in parkinson’s disease with alteration of fdg-pet irrespective of age / Lauretani, F.; Ruffini, L.; Testa, C.; Salvi, M.; Scarlattei, M.; Baldari, G.; Zucchini, I.; Lorenzi, B.; Cattabiani, C.; Maggio, M.. - In: GERIATRICS. - ISSN 2308-3417. - 6:4(2021), p. 110.110. [10.3390/geriatrics6040110]

Cognitive and behavior deficits in parkinson’s disease with alteration of fdg-pet irrespective of age

Lauretani F.;Testa C.;Salvi M.;Zucchini I.;Lorenzi B.;Maggio M.
2021

Abstract

Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the neurobiology of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Post-mortem studies are an important step and could help to comprehend not only the progression of motor symptoms, but also the involvement of other clinical domains, including cognition, behavior and impulse control disorders (ICDs). The correlation of neuropathological extension of the disease with the clinical stages remains challenging. Molecular imaging, including positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon computed tomography (SPECT), could allow for bridging the gap by providing in vivo evidence of disease extension. In the last decade, we have observed a plethora of reports describing improvements in the sensitivity of neuroimaging techniques. These data contribute to increasing the accuracy of PD diagnosis, differentiating PD from other causes of parkinsonism and also obtaining a surrogate marker of disease progression. FDG-PET has been used to measure cerebral metabolic rates of glucose, a proxy for neuronal activity, in PD. Many studies have shown that this technique could be used in early PD, where reduced metabolic activity correlates with disease progression and could predict histopathological diagnosis. The aim of this work is to report two particular cases of PD in which the assessment of brain metabolic activity (from FDG-PET) has been combined with clinical aspects of non-motor symptoms. Integration of information on neuropsychological and metabolic imaging allows us to improve the treatment of PD patients irrespective of age.
Cognitive and behavior deficits in parkinson’s disease with alteration of fdg-pet irrespective of age / Lauretani, F.; Ruffini, L.; Testa, C.; Salvi, M.; Scarlattei, M.; Baldari, G.; Zucchini, I.; Lorenzi, B.; Cattabiani, C.; Maggio, M.. - In: GERIATRICS. - ISSN 2308-3417. - 6:4(2021), p. 110.110. [10.3390/geriatrics6040110]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2904160
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