LGB+ parented families in recent years are becoming more visible, but limited information exists about how professionals interact with people in these family forms. This study used the framework of intergroup contact theory to investigate whether contact with lesbians and gay men, same-sex couples, and same-sex parents respectively increase inclusive practices towards same-sex families, and whether this association is mediated by professionals' prejudice and endorsement of same-sex families' rights. A questionnaire with scales on: (a) intergroup contact, (b) professionals' orientation towards same-sex families' inclusive practices, (c) professionals' prejudices, and (d) support of same-sex couples' rights was administered to 460 professionals (9.8% males) working in social (N = 103), education (N = 156), and healthcare (N = 201) services in Italy. Path analysis was used to test the prediction that contact increases professionals' intention to embrace inclusive practices towards same-sex families through the mediation of both prejudice and support to same-sex couples' rights to have and raise children. Results showed that contact reduced prejudices towards same-sex families and increased the endorsement of same-sex families' rights, which in turn favoured professionals' willingness to modify their practices to include these family forms. Implications for the training and development of inclusive models are discussed. Please refer to the Supplementary Material section to find this article's Community and Social Impact Statement.

Cultivating practices of inclusion towards same-sex families in Italy: A comparison among educators, social workers, and healthcare professionals / Everri, M.; Mancini, T.; O'Brien, V.; Fruggeri, L.. - In: JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY & APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 1052-9284. - (2021). [10.1002/casp.2541]

Cultivating practices of inclusion towards same-sex families in Italy: A comparison among educators, social workers, and healthcare professionals

Mancini T.;Fruggeri L.
2021

Abstract

LGB+ parented families in recent years are becoming more visible, but limited information exists about how professionals interact with people in these family forms. This study used the framework of intergroup contact theory to investigate whether contact with lesbians and gay men, same-sex couples, and same-sex parents respectively increase inclusive practices towards same-sex families, and whether this association is mediated by professionals' prejudice and endorsement of same-sex families' rights. A questionnaire with scales on: (a) intergroup contact, (b) professionals' orientation towards same-sex families' inclusive practices, (c) professionals' prejudices, and (d) support of same-sex couples' rights was administered to 460 professionals (9.8% males) working in social (N = 103), education (N = 156), and healthcare (N = 201) services in Italy. Path analysis was used to test the prediction that contact increases professionals' intention to embrace inclusive practices towards same-sex families through the mediation of both prejudice and support to same-sex couples' rights to have and raise children. Results showed that contact reduced prejudices towards same-sex families and increased the endorsement of same-sex families' rights, which in turn favoured professionals' willingness to modify their practices to include these family forms. Implications for the training and development of inclusive models are discussed. Please refer to the Supplementary Material section to find this article's Community and Social Impact Statement.
Cultivating practices of inclusion towards same-sex families in Italy: A comparison among educators, social workers, and healthcare professionals / Everri, M.; Mancini, T.; O'Brien, V.; Fruggeri, L.. - In: JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY & APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 1052-9284. - (2021). [10.1002/casp.2541]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2902140
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact