Although there is evidence supporting the benefit of regular exercise, and recommendations about exercise and physical activity, the process of individually prescribing exercise following exercise testing is more difficult. Guidelines like % heart rate (HR) reserve (HRR) require an anchoring maximal test and do not always provide a homogenous training experience. When prescribing HR on the basis of % HRR, rating of perceived exertion or Talk Test, cardiovascular/perceptual drift during sustained exercise makes prescription of the actual workload difficult. To overcome this issue, we have demonstrated a strategy for "translating" exercise test responses to steady state exercise training on the basis of % HRR or the Talk Test that appeared adequate for individuals ranging from cardiac patients to athletes. However, these methods depended on the nature of the exercise test details. In this viewpoint, we combine these data with workload expressed as Metabolic Equivalent Task (METs). We demonstrate that there is a regular stepdown between the METs during training to achieve the same degree of homeostatic disturbance during testing. The relationship was linear, was highly-correlated (r = 0.89), and averaged 71.8% (Training METs/Test METs). We conclude that it appears possible to generate a generalized approach to correctly translate exercise test responses to exercise training.

Generalized approach to translating exercise tests and prescribing exercise / Foster, C; Anholm, Jd; Bok, D; Boullosa, Da; Condello, G; Cortis, C; Fusco, A; Jaime, Sj; de Koning, Jj; Lucia, Am; Porcari, Jp; Radtke, K; Rodriguez-Marroyo, Ja. - In: JOURNAL OF FUNCTIONAL MORPHOLOGY AND KINESIOLOGY. - ISSN 2411-5142. - 5:3(2020). [10.3390/jfmk5030063]

Generalized approach to translating exercise tests and prescribing exercise

Condello G;
2020

Abstract

Although there is evidence supporting the benefit of regular exercise, and recommendations about exercise and physical activity, the process of individually prescribing exercise following exercise testing is more difficult. Guidelines like % heart rate (HR) reserve (HRR) require an anchoring maximal test and do not always provide a homogenous training experience. When prescribing HR on the basis of % HRR, rating of perceived exertion or Talk Test, cardiovascular/perceptual drift during sustained exercise makes prescription of the actual workload difficult. To overcome this issue, we have demonstrated a strategy for "translating" exercise test responses to steady state exercise training on the basis of % HRR or the Talk Test that appeared adequate for individuals ranging from cardiac patients to athletes. However, these methods depended on the nature of the exercise test details. In this viewpoint, we combine these data with workload expressed as Metabolic Equivalent Task (METs). We demonstrate that there is a regular stepdown between the METs during training to achieve the same degree of homeostatic disturbance during testing. The relationship was linear, was highly-correlated (r = 0.89), and averaged 71.8% (Training METs/Test METs). We conclude that it appears possible to generate a generalized approach to correctly translate exercise test responses to exercise training.
Generalized approach to translating exercise tests and prescribing exercise / Foster, C; Anholm, Jd; Bok, D; Boullosa, Da; Condello, G; Cortis, C; Fusco, A; Jaime, Sj; de Koning, Jj; Lucia, Am; Porcari, Jp; Radtke, K; Rodriguez-Marroyo, Ja. - In: JOURNAL OF FUNCTIONAL MORPHOLOGY AND KINESIOLOGY. - ISSN 2411-5142. - 5:3(2020). [10.3390/jfmk5030063]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2901714
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