Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) environmental contamination occurs through droplets and biological fluids released in the surroundings from patients or asymptomatic carriers. Surfaces and objects contaminated by saliva or nose secretions represent a risk for indirect transmission of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We assayed surfaces from hospital and living spaces to identify the presence of viral RNA and the spread of fomites in the environment. Anthropic contamination by droplets and biological fluids was monitored by detecting the microbiota signature using multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) on selected species and massive sequencing on 16S amplicons. A total of 92 samples (flocked swabs) were collected from critical areas during the pandemic, including indoor (three hospitals and three public buildings) and outdoor surfaces exposed to anthropic contamination (handles and handrails, playgrounds). Traces of biological fluids were frequently detected in spaces open to the public and on objects that are touched with the hands (.80%). However, viral RNA was not detected in hospital wards or other indoor and outdoor surfaces either in the air system of a COVID hospital but only in the surroundings of an infected patient, in consistent association with droplet traces and fomites. Handled objects accumulated the highest level of multiple contaminations by saliva, nose secretions, and fecal traces, further supporting the priority role of handwashing in prevention. In conclusion, anthropic contamination by droplets and biological fluids is widespread in spaces open to the public and can be traced by qPCR. Monitoring fomites can support evaluation of indirect transmission risks for coronavirus or other flu-like viruses in the environment.

Monitoring COVID-19 Transmission Risks by Quantitative RealTime PCR Tracing of Droplets in Hospital and Living Environments / Piana, A.; Colucci, Maria Eugenia; Valeriani, F.; Marcolongo, A.; Sotgiu, G.; Pasquarella, C.; Marika Margarucci, L.; Petrucca, A.; Gianfranceschi, G.; Babudieri, S.; Vitali, P.; D'Ermo, G.; Bizzarro, A.; De Maio, F.; Vitali, M.; Azara, A.; Romano Spicac, V.; Romano, F.; Simmaco, M.. - In: MSPHERE. - ISSN 2379-5042. - 6:1(2021), pp. e01070-20.1-e01070-20.15. [10.1128/MSPHERE.01070-20]

Monitoring COVID-19 Transmission Risks by Quantitative RealTime PCR Tracing of Droplets in Hospital and Living Environments

Maria Eugenia Colucci.;Pasquarella C.;Bizzarro A.;
2021

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) environmental contamination occurs through droplets and biological fluids released in the surroundings from patients or asymptomatic carriers. Surfaces and objects contaminated by saliva or nose secretions represent a risk for indirect transmission of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We assayed surfaces from hospital and living spaces to identify the presence of viral RNA and the spread of fomites in the environment. Anthropic contamination by droplets and biological fluids was monitored by detecting the microbiota signature using multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) on selected species and massive sequencing on 16S amplicons. A total of 92 samples (flocked swabs) were collected from critical areas during the pandemic, including indoor (three hospitals and three public buildings) and outdoor surfaces exposed to anthropic contamination (handles and handrails, playgrounds). Traces of biological fluids were frequently detected in spaces open to the public and on objects that are touched with the hands (.80%). However, viral RNA was not detected in hospital wards or other indoor and outdoor surfaces either in the air system of a COVID hospital but only in the surroundings of an infected patient, in consistent association with droplet traces and fomites. Handled objects accumulated the highest level of multiple contaminations by saliva, nose secretions, and fecal traces, further supporting the priority role of handwashing in prevention. In conclusion, anthropic contamination by droplets and biological fluids is widespread in spaces open to the public and can be traced by qPCR. Monitoring fomites can support evaluation of indirect transmission risks for coronavirus or other flu-like viruses in the environment.
Monitoring COVID-19 Transmission Risks by Quantitative RealTime PCR Tracing of Droplets in Hospital and Living Environments / Piana, A.; Colucci, Maria Eugenia; Valeriani, F.; Marcolongo, A.; Sotgiu, G.; Pasquarella, C.; Marika Margarucci, L.; Petrucca, A.; Gianfranceschi, G.; Babudieri, S.; Vitali, P.; D'Ermo, G.; Bizzarro, A.; De Maio, F.; Vitali, M.; Azara, A.; Romano Spicac, V.; Romano, F.; Simmaco, M.. - In: MSPHERE. - ISSN 2379-5042. - 6:1(2021), pp. e01070-20.1-e01070-20.15. [10.1128/MSPHERE.01070-20]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2896470
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