Background: Intestinal parasitoses are now being diagnosed with increasing frequency in industrialized countries probably as a consequence of the globalization of the food supply, of the immigration/adoption from endemic regions, and of travels through the same areas. This study reports the investigation of imported intestinal parasitoses in Parma, Italy, a non-endemic setting, during 2011-2018 with a comparison between those revealed in Italians and in immigrants from developing countries. Materials/methods: In our laboratory, from 2011 to 2018, conventional diagnosis of intestinal parasitosis (microscopic examination of fresh/concentrated faeces and cultivation in Robinson’s medium) was performed on 20,978 faecal samples belonging to 13,596 patients, all presenting with the clinical suspicion of intestinal parasitosis; the foreigner patients included in the study were from developing countries, mainly from Sub-Saharian Africa. Real-time PCR assays for the differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar and for the detection of Dientamoeba fragilis were also used when clinical manifestation and/or risk factors for parasitic infections were reported, and/or when diagnostic stages of intestinal parasites were detected by microscopy. Results: Intestinal parasitosis was diagnosed in 2671 patients (19.6%), about half of whom were immigrants from developing countries. For 15% of Italians and 36.2% of Foreigners at least one intestinal parasite was detected. The most common intestinal protozoa detected were Blastocystis hominis, D. fragilis and Giardia intestinalis, while the most prevalent helminths were Strongyloides stercoralis, Enterobius vermicularis, and Taenia saginata. A total of 204 (71%) helminthic infection was revealed in Foreigners. For 2.6% of Italians and 13% of Foreigners a mixed infection was foundon the total of 663 mixed infections (co-infection by protozoa, helminths and/or by protozoa and helminths) detected, 380 were revealed in Foreigners. Conclusions: The data presented confirm the importance of suspecting parasitic infections together with the use of appropriate diagnostic tools even in non-endemic areas, where, besides autochthonous intestinal parasitoses, imported ones are frequently diagnosed. The probability to reveal the presence of such agents increase also as a result of the high number of “forced migrants” coming during recent years from their origin countries afflicted by inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene conditions.

An epidemiological overview of intestinal parasitoses in a non-endemic setting: a comparison between Italians and immigrants from developing countries during the years 2011-2018 / Calderaro, A.; Montecchini, S.; Buttrini, M.; Rossi, S.; Motta, F; Piccolo, G.; Antonaci, M.; Dell’Anna, M. L.; Arcangeletti, M. C.; Chezzi, C.; De Conto, F. - (2020). ((Intervento presentato al convegno XXX European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

An epidemiological overview of intestinal parasitoses in a non-endemic setting: a comparison between Italians and immigrants from developing countries during the years 2011-2018

Calderaro A.;Montecchini S.;Buttrini M.;Rossi S.;Motta F;Piccolo G.;Arcangeletti M. C.;Chezzi C.;De Conto F
2020

Abstract

Background: Intestinal parasitoses are now being diagnosed with increasing frequency in industrialized countries probably as a consequence of the globalization of the food supply, of the immigration/adoption from endemic regions, and of travels through the same areas. This study reports the investigation of imported intestinal parasitoses in Parma, Italy, a non-endemic setting, during 2011-2018 with a comparison between those revealed in Italians and in immigrants from developing countries. Materials/methods: In our laboratory, from 2011 to 2018, conventional diagnosis of intestinal parasitosis (microscopic examination of fresh/concentrated faeces and cultivation in Robinson’s medium) was performed on 20,978 faecal samples belonging to 13,596 patients, all presenting with the clinical suspicion of intestinal parasitosis; the foreigner patients included in the study were from developing countries, mainly from Sub-Saharian Africa. Real-time PCR assays for the differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar and for the detection of Dientamoeba fragilis were also used when clinical manifestation and/or risk factors for parasitic infections were reported, and/or when diagnostic stages of intestinal parasites were detected by microscopy. Results: Intestinal parasitosis was diagnosed in 2671 patients (19.6%), about half of whom were immigrants from developing countries. For 15% of Italians and 36.2% of Foreigners at least one intestinal parasite was detected. The most common intestinal protozoa detected were Blastocystis hominis, D. fragilis and Giardia intestinalis, while the most prevalent helminths were Strongyloides stercoralis, Enterobius vermicularis, and Taenia saginata. A total of 204 (71%) helminthic infection was revealed in Foreigners. For 2.6% of Italians and 13% of Foreigners a mixed infection was foundon the total of 663 mixed infections (co-infection by protozoa, helminths and/or by protozoa and helminths) detected, 380 were revealed in Foreigners. Conclusions: The data presented confirm the importance of suspecting parasitic infections together with the use of appropriate diagnostic tools even in non-endemic areas, where, besides autochthonous intestinal parasitoses, imported ones are frequently diagnosed. The probability to reveal the presence of such agents increase also as a result of the high number of “forced migrants” coming during recent years from their origin countries afflicted by inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene conditions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2892481
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