The rRT-PCR test, the current gold standard for the detection of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), presents with known shortcomings, such as long turnaround time, potential shortage of reagents, false-negative rates around 15-20%, and expensive equipment. The hematochemical values of routine blood exams could represent a faster and less expensive alternative. Three different training data set of hematochemical values from 1,624 patients (52% COVID-19 positive), admitted at San Raphael Hospital (OSR) from February to May 2020, were used for developing machine learning (ML) models: the complete OSR dataset (72 features: complete blood count (CBC), biochemical, coagulation, hemogasanalysis and CO-Oxymetry values, age, sex and specific symptoms at triage) and two sub-datasets (COVID-specific and CBC dataset, 32 and 21 features respectively). 58 cases (50% COVID-19 positive) from another hospital, and 54 negative patients collected in 2018 at OSR, were used for internal-external and external validation. We developed five ML models: for the complete OSR dataset, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the algorithms ranged from 0.83 to 0.90; for the COVID-specific dataset from 0.83 to 0.87; and for the CBC dataset from 0.74 to 0.86. The validations also achieved good results: respectively, AUC from 0.75 to 0.78; and specificity from 0.92 to 0.96. ML can be applied to blood tests as both an adjunct and alternative method to rRT-PCR for the fast and cost-effective identification of COVID-19-positive patients. This is especially useful in developing countries, or in countries facing an increase in contagions.

Development, evaluation, and validation of machine learning models for COVID-19 detection based on routine blood tests / Cabitza, F.; Campagner, A.; Ferrari, D.; Di Resta, C.; Ceriotti, D.; Sabetta, E.; Colombini, A.; De Vecchi, E.; Banfi, G.; Locatelli, M.; Carobene, A.. - In: CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE. - ISSN 1434-6621. - 0:0(2020). [10.1515/cclm-2020-1294]

Development, evaluation, and validation of machine learning models for COVID-19 detection based on routine blood tests

Ferrari D.
Conceptualization
;
2020

Abstract

The rRT-PCR test, the current gold standard for the detection of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), presents with known shortcomings, such as long turnaround time, potential shortage of reagents, false-negative rates around 15-20%, and expensive equipment. The hematochemical values of routine blood exams could represent a faster and less expensive alternative. Three different training data set of hematochemical values from 1,624 patients (52% COVID-19 positive), admitted at San Raphael Hospital (OSR) from February to May 2020, were used for developing machine learning (ML) models: the complete OSR dataset (72 features: complete blood count (CBC), biochemical, coagulation, hemogasanalysis and CO-Oxymetry values, age, sex and specific symptoms at triage) and two sub-datasets (COVID-specific and CBC dataset, 32 and 21 features respectively). 58 cases (50% COVID-19 positive) from another hospital, and 54 negative patients collected in 2018 at OSR, were used for internal-external and external validation. We developed five ML models: for the complete OSR dataset, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the algorithms ranged from 0.83 to 0.90; for the COVID-specific dataset from 0.83 to 0.87; and for the CBC dataset from 0.74 to 0.86. The validations also achieved good results: respectively, AUC from 0.75 to 0.78; and specificity from 0.92 to 0.96. ML can be applied to blood tests as both an adjunct and alternative method to rRT-PCR for the fast and cost-effective identification of COVID-19-positive patients. This is especially useful in developing countries, or in countries facing an increase in contagions.
Development, evaluation, and validation of machine learning models for COVID-19 detection based on routine blood tests / Cabitza, F.; Campagner, A.; Ferrari, D.; Di Resta, C.; Ceriotti, D.; Sabetta, E.; Colombini, A.; De Vecchi, E.; Banfi, G.; Locatelli, M.; Carobene, A.. - In: CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE. - ISSN 1434-6621. - 0:0(2020). [10.1515/cclm-2020-1294]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2884464
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