Integration of body-related signals within the peripersonal space (PPS) contributes to bodily self-awareness. Whereas several studies have shown how individual PPS extension is shaped by external factors, e.g. during interactions with people and objects, no studies have looked at interoceptive influences on PPS extension. We exposed participants to an audio-tactile interaction task, to measure their PPS boundary (Session 1), and to a heartbeat counting task and a time estimation task, to specifically assess their interoceptive accuracy (Session 2). Participants’ traits of private self-consciousness and social anxiety were also evaluated, to account for their possible effect on the relation between interoception and PPS representation. We found that higher interoceptive accuracy specifically predicts narrower PPS boundary. Moreover, this relation is moderated by individual traits of private self-consciousness, but not social anxiety. Extending the concept of interoceptive influences on exteroceptive body representations to PPS, our results, first, support the idea that a dynamic balance between intero-exteroceptive processing might represent a general principle underlying bodily self-awareness; second, they shed light on how interoception may affect also the way we interface with the external world. Finally, showing that, in order for interoceptive accuracy to be effective on the intero-exteroceptive balance, it is important that individuals tend to focus on inner sensations and feelings, our results suggest that a comprehensive intero-exteroceptive model of bodily self-awareness should be (at least) a three-dimensional model that includes individual self-consciousness traits.

Interoceptive influences on peripersonal space boundary / Ardizzi, M.; Ferri, F.. - In: COGNITION. - ISSN 0010-0277. - 177:(2018), pp. 79-86. [10.1016/j.cognition.2018.04.001]

Interoceptive influences on peripersonal space boundary

Ardizzi M.;Ferri F.
2018

Abstract

Integration of body-related signals within the peripersonal space (PPS) contributes to bodily self-awareness. Whereas several studies have shown how individual PPS extension is shaped by external factors, e.g. during interactions with people and objects, no studies have looked at interoceptive influences on PPS extension. We exposed participants to an audio-tactile interaction task, to measure their PPS boundary (Session 1), and to a heartbeat counting task and a time estimation task, to specifically assess their interoceptive accuracy (Session 2). Participants’ traits of private self-consciousness and social anxiety were also evaluated, to account for their possible effect on the relation between interoception and PPS representation. We found that higher interoceptive accuracy specifically predicts narrower PPS boundary. Moreover, this relation is moderated by individual traits of private self-consciousness, but not social anxiety. Extending the concept of interoceptive influences on exteroceptive body representations to PPS, our results, first, support the idea that a dynamic balance between intero-exteroceptive processing might represent a general principle underlying bodily self-awareness; second, they shed light on how interoception may affect also the way we interface with the external world. Finally, showing that, in order for interoceptive accuracy to be effective on the intero-exteroceptive balance, it is important that individuals tend to focus on inner sensations and feelings, our results suggest that a comprehensive intero-exteroceptive model of bodily self-awareness should be (at least) a three-dimensional model that includes individual self-consciousness traits.
Interoceptive influences on peripersonal space boundary / Ardizzi, M.; Ferri, F.. - In: COGNITION. - ISSN 0010-0277. - 177:(2018), pp. 79-86. [10.1016/j.cognition.2018.04.001]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2879827
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