Increased life expectancy and broader restorative dental treatment alternatives for missing teeth have resulted in an increasing request of bone regeneration/augmentation procedures not only in healthy patients, but also in elderly and medically compromised ones. This is also combined with a growing demand for short implant loading protocols and for optimal aesthetic results. In order to meet these new dental needs, personalized treatment strategies tailored on each individual's characteristics and healing profile are warranted. Omics technologies are emerging as powerful tools to uncover molecules and signalling pathways involved in bone formation and osseointegration and to investigate differences in the molecular mechanisms between health and systemic diseases that could be targeted by future therapies. This review critically appraises the available knowledge on the application of omics technologies in the field of bone regeneration and osseointegration and explores their potential use for personalized medicine in the dento-maxillo-facial field. Significance: The use of omics in personalising dental maxillo-facial treatments emerges as a desirable diagnostic and treatment strategy. Omics represent, in fact, powerful tools not only to shade light on the cascade of events taking place during bone formation/osseointegration, but also to identify specific signalling pathways and molecules that can be targeted by future therapies with the aim to enhance clinical outcomes in patients with compromised healing conditions.

The use of omics profiling to improve outcomes of bone regeneration and osseointegration. How far are we from personalized medicine in dentistry? / Calciolari, E.; Donos, N.. - In: JOURNAL OF PROTEOMICS. - ISSN 1874-3919. - 188:(2018), pp. 85-96. [10.1016/j.jprot.2018.01.017]

The use of omics profiling to improve outcomes of bone regeneration and osseointegration. How far are we from personalized medicine in dentistry?

Calciolari E.
;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Increased life expectancy and broader restorative dental treatment alternatives for missing teeth have resulted in an increasing request of bone regeneration/augmentation procedures not only in healthy patients, but also in elderly and medically compromised ones. This is also combined with a growing demand for short implant loading protocols and for optimal aesthetic results. In order to meet these new dental needs, personalized treatment strategies tailored on each individual's characteristics and healing profile are warranted. Omics technologies are emerging as powerful tools to uncover molecules and signalling pathways involved in bone formation and osseointegration and to investigate differences in the molecular mechanisms between health and systemic diseases that could be targeted by future therapies. This review critically appraises the available knowledge on the application of omics technologies in the field of bone regeneration and osseointegration and explores their potential use for personalized medicine in the dento-maxillo-facial field. Significance: The use of omics in personalising dental maxillo-facial treatments emerges as a desirable diagnostic and treatment strategy. Omics represent, in fact, powerful tools not only to shade light on the cascade of events taking place during bone formation/osseointegration, but also to identify specific signalling pathways and molecules that can be targeted by future therapies with the aim to enhance clinical outcomes in patients with compromised healing conditions.
2018
The use of omics profiling to improve outcomes of bone regeneration and osseointegration. How far are we from personalized medicine in dentistry? / Calciolari, E.; Donos, N.. - In: JOURNAL OF PROTEOMICS. - ISSN 1874-3919. - 188:(2018), pp. 85-96. [10.1016/j.jprot.2018.01.017]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2870587
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