Ureteral stenting is a common practice in human medicine and has recently been reported in dogs and cats to provide urinary diversion for ureteral obstructions caused by ureteroliths, strictures, neoplasia, and in an attempt to prevent postoperative complications following ureteral anastomosis. The aim of this report is to describe a surgical technique of ureteral stenting and the follow-up and complications in nine cats. Number 3 French double-J catheters were used during open surgery for ureterotomy/ureterolith removal in eight cats and for segmental ureterectomy/end-to-end anastomosis in one cat for a localized benign stricture. Neoureterocystostomy was necessary in eight of the cats. Uroperitoneum did not occur. Stents were still in place in 7/9 animals after 357–1565 days (median 1277). A minor complication (stent migration) occurred in one cat, but stent removal was not required. Major complications were encrustation and persistent stranguria (in one cat each), requiring stent removal at 90 and 123 days, respectively. The first cat had a new stent inserted but was euthanased 3 months later for progressive renal failure. Despite the small number of cats, both the outcome and long-term stent tolerance observed in most cases suggest that ureteral stenting is a safe, adjunctive measure to ureteral surgery, mainly for concomitant ureteral and renal pelvic stones to prevent further obstruction and avoid pyelotomy/nephrotomy. However, smaller stents should be used to decrease the need for ureteral surgery.

Double-J ureteral stenting in nine cats with ureteral obstruction / Nicoli, S; Morello, E; Martano, M; Pisoni, L; Buracco, P. - In: THE VETERINARY JOURNAL. - ISSN 1090-0233. - 194:1(2012), pp. 60-65. [10.1016/j.tvjl.2012.03.020]

Double-J ureteral stenting in nine cats with ureteral obstruction

Morello E;Martano M;Buracco P
2012

Abstract

Ureteral stenting is a common practice in human medicine and has recently been reported in dogs and cats to provide urinary diversion for ureteral obstructions caused by ureteroliths, strictures, neoplasia, and in an attempt to prevent postoperative complications following ureteral anastomosis. The aim of this report is to describe a surgical technique of ureteral stenting and the follow-up and complications in nine cats. Number 3 French double-J catheters were used during open surgery for ureterotomy/ureterolith removal in eight cats and for segmental ureterectomy/end-to-end anastomosis in one cat for a localized benign stricture. Neoureterocystostomy was necessary in eight of the cats. Uroperitoneum did not occur. Stents were still in place in 7/9 animals after 357–1565 days (median 1277). A minor complication (stent migration) occurred in one cat, but stent removal was not required. Major complications were encrustation and persistent stranguria (in one cat each), requiring stent removal at 90 and 123 days, respectively. The first cat had a new stent inserted but was euthanased 3 months later for progressive renal failure. Despite the small number of cats, both the outcome and long-term stent tolerance observed in most cases suggest that ureteral stenting is a safe, adjunctive measure to ureteral surgery, mainly for concomitant ureteral and renal pelvic stones to prevent further obstruction and avoid pyelotomy/nephrotomy. However, smaller stents should be used to decrease the need for ureteral surgery.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2870095
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