Background Available diagnostics often fail to distinguish viral from bacterial causes of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia (pCAP). Metabolomics, which aims at characterizing diseases based on their metabolic signatures, has been applied to expand pathophysiological understanding of many diseases. In this exploratory study, we used the untargeted metabolomic analysis to shed new light on the etiology of pCAP. Methods Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used to quantify the metabolite content of urine samples collected from children hospitalized for CAP of pneumococcal or viral etiology, ascertained using a conservative algorithm combining microbiological and biochemical data. Results Fifty-nine children with CAP were enrolled over 16 months. Pneumococcal and viral cases were distinguished by means of a multivariate model based on 93 metabolites, 20 of which were identified and considered as putative biomarkers. Among these, six metabolites belonged to the adrenal steroid synthesis and degradation pathway. Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that viral and pneumococcal pneumonia differently affect the systemic metabolome, with a stronger disruption of the adrenal steroid pathway in pneumococcal pneumonia. This finding may lead to the discovery of novel diagnostic biomarkers and bring us closer to personalized therapy for pCAP.

New insights into pediatric community-acquired pneumonia gained from untargeted metabolomics: A preliminary study / Del Borrello, Giovanni; Stocchero, Matteo; Giordano, Giuseppe; Pirillo, Paola; Zanconato, Stefania; Da Dalt, Liviana; Carraro, Silvia; Esposito, Susanna; Baraldi, Eugenio. - In: PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY. - ISSN 8755-6863. - 55:2(2020), pp. -418. [10.1002/ppul.24602]

New insights into pediatric community-acquired pneumonia gained from untargeted metabolomics: A preliminary study

Esposito, Susanna;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Background Available diagnostics often fail to distinguish viral from bacterial causes of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia (pCAP). Metabolomics, which aims at characterizing diseases based on their metabolic signatures, has been applied to expand pathophysiological understanding of many diseases. In this exploratory study, we used the untargeted metabolomic analysis to shed new light on the etiology of pCAP. Methods Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used to quantify the metabolite content of urine samples collected from children hospitalized for CAP of pneumococcal or viral etiology, ascertained using a conservative algorithm combining microbiological and biochemical data. Results Fifty-nine children with CAP were enrolled over 16 months. Pneumococcal and viral cases were distinguished by means of a multivariate model based on 93 metabolites, 20 of which were identified and considered as putative biomarkers. Among these, six metabolites belonged to the adrenal steroid synthesis and degradation pathway. Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that viral and pneumococcal pneumonia differently affect the systemic metabolome, with a stronger disruption of the adrenal steroid pathway in pneumococcal pneumonia. This finding may lead to the discovery of novel diagnostic biomarkers and bring us closer to personalized therapy for pCAP.
New insights into pediatric community-acquired pneumonia gained from untargeted metabolomics: A preliminary study / Del Borrello, Giovanni; Stocchero, Matteo; Giordano, Giuseppe; Pirillo, Paola; Zanconato, Stefania; Da Dalt, Liviana; Carraro, Silvia; Esposito, Susanna; Baraldi, Eugenio. - In: PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY. - ISSN 8755-6863. - 55:2(2020), pp. -418. [10.1002/ppul.24602]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2868978
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