The optimal nutritional support in Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) still remains an open issue. The present study was aimed at evaluating the validity of conventional predictive formulas for the calculation of both energy expenditure and protein needs in critically ill patients with AKI. A prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted on adult patients hospitalized with AKI in three different intensive care units (ICU). Nutrient needs were estimated by different methods: the Guidelines of the European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ESPEN) for both calories and proteins, the Harris-Benedict equation, the Penn-State and Faisy-Fagon equations for energy. Actual energy and protein needs were repeatedly measured by indirect calorimetry (IC) and protein catabolic rate (PCR) until oral nutrition start, hospital discharge or renal function recovery. Forty-two patients with AKI were enrolled, with 130 IC and 123 PCR measurements obtained over 654 days of artificial nutrition. No predictive formula was precise enough, and Bland-Altman plots wide limits of agreement for all equations highlight the potential to under-or overfeed individual patients. Conventional predictive formulas may frequently lead to incorrect energy and protein need estimation. In critically ill patients with AKI an increased risk for under-or overfeeding is likely when nutrient needs are estimated instead of measured.

Energy and protein in critically Ill patients with AKI: A prospective, multicenter observational study using indirect calorimetry and protein catabolic rate / Sabatino, A.; Theilla, M.; Hellerman, M.; Singer, P.; Maggiore, U.; Barbagallo, M.; Regolisti, G.; Fiaccadori, E.. - In: NUTRIENTS. - ISSN 2072-6643. - 9:8(2017), pp. 802-815. [10.3390/nu9080802]

Energy and protein in critically Ill patients with AKI: A prospective, multicenter observational study using indirect calorimetry and protein catabolic rate

Sabatino A.;Maggiore U.;Barbagallo M.;Fiaccadori E.
2017

Abstract

The optimal nutritional support in Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) still remains an open issue. The present study was aimed at evaluating the validity of conventional predictive formulas for the calculation of both energy expenditure and protein needs in critically ill patients with AKI. A prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted on adult patients hospitalized with AKI in three different intensive care units (ICU). Nutrient needs were estimated by different methods: the Guidelines of the European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ESPEN) for both calories and proteins, the Harris-Benedict equation, the Penn-State and Faisy-Fagon equations for energy. Actual energy and protein needs were repeatedly measured by indirect calorimetry (IC) and protein catabolic rate (PCR) until oral nutrition start, hospital discharge or renal function recovery. Forty-two patients with AKI were enrolled, with 130 IC and 123 PCR measurements obtained over 654 days of artificial nutrition. No predictive formula was precise enough, and Bland-Altman plots wide limits of agreement for all equations highlight the potential to under-or overfeed individual patients. Conventional predictive formulas may frequently lead to incorrect energy and protein need estimation. In critically ill patients with AKI an increased risk for under-or overfeeding is likely when nutrient needs are estimated instead of measured.
Energy and protein in critically Ill patients with AKI: A prospective, multicenter observational study using indirect calorimetry and protein catabolic rate / Sabatino, A.; Theilla, M.; Hellerman, M.; Singer, P.; Maggiore, U.; Barbagallo, M.; Regolisti, G.; Fiaccadori, E.. - In: NUTRIENTS. - ISSN 2072-6643. - 9:8(2017), pp. 802-815. [10.3390/nu9080802]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2867731
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