The endogenous opioid system has received attention and extensive research for its effects on reward, pleasure, and pain. However, relative to other neurochemicals, such as oxytocin, vasopressin and dopamine, the function of opioids in regulating human attachment, sociosexuality, and other aspects of human sociality has not received much consideration. For example, nonapeptides (oxytocin and vasopressin) have been extensively studied in animals and humans for their possible roles in mother-offspring attachment, romantic attachment, fatherhood, and social cognition. Likewise, others have proposed models wherein oxytocin and vasopressin are moderators of the relationship between steroid hormones and human social behaviors. Recently, opioids have generated renewed interest in relation to social pain, and importantly, the brain opioid hypothesis of social attachment (BOTSA), which suggests that endogenous opioids are a key implementer in primate and human bonding, has received some support. Here we focus on romantic bonds by proposing that endogenous opioids are an important mechanism mediating reproductive trade-offs through their inhibitory effects on testosterone production.

The Influence of Endogenous Opioids on the Relationship between Testosterone and Romantic Bonding / Ponzi, D.; Dandy, M.. - In: HUMAN NATURE. - ISSN 1045-6767. - 30:1(2019), pp. 98-116. [10.1007/s12110-018-9332-4]

The Influence of Endogenous Opioids on the Relationship between Testosterone and Romantic Bonding

Ponzi D.
;
2019-01-01

Abstract

The endogenous opioid system has received attention and extensive research for its effects on reward, pleasure, and pain. However, relative to other neurochemicals, such as oxytocin, vasopressin and dopamine, the function of opioids in regulating human attachment, sociosexuality, and other aspects of human sociality has not received much consideration. For example, nonapeptides (oxytocin and vasopressin) have been extensively studied in animals and humans for their possible roles in mother-offspring attachment, romantic attachment, fatherhood, and social cognition. Likewise, others have proposed models wherein oxytocin and vasopressin are moderators of the relationship between steroid hormones and human social behaviors. Recently, opioids have generated renewed interest in relation to social pain, and importantly, the brain opioid hypothesis of social attachment (BOTSA), which suggests that endogenous opioids are a key implementer in primate and human bonding, has received some support. Here we focus on romantic bonds by proposing that endogenous opioids are an important mechanism mediating reproductive trade-offs through their inhibitory effects on testosterone production.
The Influence of Endogenous Opioids on the Relationship between Testosterone and Romantic Bonding / Ponzi, D.; Dandy, M.. - In: HUMAN NATURE. - ISSN 1045-6767. - 30:1(2019), pp. 98-116. [10.1007/s12110-018-9332-4]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2867105
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