OBJECTIVES To examine whether performance in the Trail Making Test (TMT) predicts mobility impairment and mortality in older persons. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING Community-dwelling older persons enrolled in the Invecchiare in Chianti (InCHIANTI) Study. PARTICIPANTS Five hundred eighty-three participants aged 65 and older and free of major cognitive impairment (Mini-Mental State Examination score > 21) with baseline data on TMT performance. Of these, 427 performed the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) for the assessment of lower extremity function at baseline and after 6 years. Of the initial 583 participants, 106 died during a 9-year follow-up. MEASUREMENTS The TMT Parts A and B (TMT-A and TMT-B) and SPPB were administered at baseline and 6-year follow-up. Impaired mobility was defined as an SPPB score less than 10. Vital status was ascertained over a 9-year follow-up. RESULTS InCHIANTI participants in the fourth quartile of the time to complete TMT-B minus time to complete TMT-A (TMT (B-A)) were significantly more likely to develop an SPPB score less than 10 during the 6-year follow-up than those in the first quartile (relative risk (RR)=2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.4-3.9, P=.001). After adjusting for potential confounders, these findings were substantially unchanged (RR=2.2, 95% CI=1.4-3.6, P=.001). Worse performance on the TMT was associated with significantly greater decline in SPPB score over the 6-year follow-up, after adjusting for age, sex, and baseline SPPB scores (beta=-0.01, standard error=0.003, P=.004). During the 9-year follow-up, 18.2% of the participants died. After adjustment for age and sex, the proportion of participants who died was higher in participants in the worst than the best performance quartile of TMT (B-A) scores (hazard ratio (HR)=1.7, 95% CI=1.0-2.9, P=.048). Results were similar in a parsimonious adjusted model (HR=1.8, 95% CI=1.0-3.2, P=.04). CONCLUSION Performance on the TMT is a strong, independent predictor of mobility impairment, accelerated decline in lower extremity function, and death in older adults living in the community. The TMT could be a useful addition to geriatric assessment.

Trail Making Test Predicts Physical Impairment and Mortality in Older Persons / Vazzana, R; Bandinelli, S; Lauretani, F; Volpato, S; Lauretani, F; Di Iorio, A; Abate, M; Corsi, Am; Milaneschi, Y; Guralnik, Jm; Ferrucci, L. - In: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY. - ISSN 0002-8614. - 58:4(2010), pp. 719-723. [10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.02780.x]

Trail Making Test Predicts Physical Impairment and Mortality in Older Persons

Lauretani F;
2010

Abstract

OBJECTIVES To examine whether performance in the Trail Making Test (TMT) predicts mobility impairment and mortality in older persons. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING Community-dwelling older persons enrolled in the Invecchiare in Chianti (InCHIANTI) Study. PARTICIPANTS Five hundred eighty-three participants aged 65 and older and free of major cognitive impairment (Mini-Mental State Examination score > 21) with baseline data on TMT performance. Of these, 427 performed the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) for the assessment of lower extremity function at baseline and after 6 years. Of the initial 583 participants, 106 died during a 9-year follow-up. MEASUREMENTS The TMT Parts A and B (TMT-A and TMT-B) and SPPB were administered at baseline and 6-year follow-up. Impaired mobility was defined as an SPPB score less than 10. Vital status was ascertained over a 9-year follow-up. RESULTS InCHIANTI participants in the fourth quartile of the time to complete TMT-B minus time to complete TMT-A (TMT (B-A)) were significantly more likely to develop an SPPB score less than 10 during the 6-year follow-up than those in the first quartile (relative risk (RR)=2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.4-3.9, P=.001). After adjusting for potential confounders, these findings were substantially unchanged (RR=2.2, 95% CI=1.4-3.6, P=.001). Worse performance on the TMT was associated with significantly greater decline in SPPB score over the 6-year follow-up, after adjusting for age, sex, and baseline SPPB scores (beta=-0.01, standard error=0.003, P=.004). During the 9-year follow-up, 18.2% of the participants died. After adjustment for age and sex, the proportion of participants who died was higher in participants in the worst than the best performance quartile of TMT (B-A) scores (hazard ratio (HR)=1.7, 95% CI=1.0-2.9, P=.048). Results were similar in a parsimonious adjusted model (HR=1.8, 95% CI=1.0-3.2, P=.04). CONCLUSION Performance on the TMT is a strong, independent predictor of mobility impairment, accelerated decline in lower extremity function, and death in older adults living in the community. The TMT could be a useful addition to geriatric assessment.
Trail Making Test Predicts Physical Impairment and Mortality in Older Persons / Vazzana, R; Bandinelli, S; Lauretani, F; Volpato, S; Lauretani, F; Di Iorio, A; Abate, M; Corsi, Am; Milaneschi, Y; Guralnik, Jm; Ferrucci, L. - In: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY. - ISSN 0002-8614. - 58:4(2010), pp. 719-723. [10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.02780.x]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2865152
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