This study aims to analyze virtual self-discrepancy (VSD), avatar identification, and gaming addiction in Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs). Two studies were conducted to test the relations between VSDs (i.e., idealized vs utopian avatar), avatar identification, and gaming addiction. In the cross-sectional survey (Study 1; 770 MMORPGs players) we assumed that higher MMORPG addiction was directly predicted by the construction of an idealized avatar (vs. utopian avatar) and by the avatar identification, which also mediated the relationship between the VSDs and gaming addiction. In the 2 × 2 experimental study (Study 2; 100 participants), manipulating VSD and avatar identification, we assumed that MMORPG addiction risk was higher in the idealized avatar-high identification condition than in the utopian avatar-low identification condition. Results confirmed that the more idealized the avatar was, the more the users increased their avatar identification (Study 1), that in turn was associated with gaming addiction (Study 1 and Study 2), and that only an idealized avatar (vs. utopian avatar) directly affected gaming addiction (Study 1). Furthermore, results showed that MMORPG addiction risk was higher in participants who customized an idealized avatar and identified with it (vs. utopian avatar-low identification) (Study 2).

Does avatar's character and emotional bond expose to gaming addiction? Two studies on virtual self-discrepancy, avatar identification and gaming addiction in massively multiplayer online role-playing game players / Mancini, Tiziana; Imperato, Chiara; Sibilla, Federica. - In: COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR. - ISSN 0747-5632. - 92:(2019), pp. 297-305. [10.1016/j.chb.2018.11.007]

Does avatar's character and emotional bond expose to gaming addiction? Two studies on virtual self-discrepancy, avatar identification and gaming addiction in massively multiplayer online role-playing game players

Mancini, Tiziana
;
IMPERATO, CHIARA;Sibilla, Federica
2019-01-01

Abstract

This study aims to analyze virtual self-discrepancy (VSD), avatar identification, and gaming addiction in Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs). Two studies were conducted to test the relations between VSDs (i.e., idealized vs utopian avatar), avatar identification, and gaming addiction. In the cross-sectional survey (Study 1; 770 MMORPGs players) we assumed that higher MMORPG addiction was directly predicted by the construction of an idealized avatar (vs. utopian avatar) and by the avatar identification, which also mediated the relationship between the VSDs and gaming addiction. In the 2 × 2 experimental study (Study 2; 100 participants), manipulating VSD and avatar identification, we assumed that MMORPG addiction risk was higher in the idealized avatar-high identification condition than in the utopian avatar-low identification condition. Results confirmed that the more idealized the avatar was, the more the users increased their avatar identification (Study 1), that in turn was associated with gaming addiction (Study 1 and Study 2), and that only an idealized avatar (vs. utopian avatar) directly affected gaming addiction (Study 1). Furthermore, results showed that MMORPG addiction risk was higher in participants who customized an idealized avatar and identified with it (vs. utopian avatar-low identification) (Study 2).
2019
Does avatar's character and emotional bond expose to gaming addiction? Two studies on virtual self-discrepancy, avatar identification and gaming addiction in massively multiplayer online role-playing game players / Mancini, Tiziana; Imperato, Chiara; Sibilla, Federica. - In: COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR. - ISSN 0747-5632. - 92:(2019), pp. 297-305. [10.1016/j.chb.2018.11.007]
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
ACCEPTED MANUSCRIT, 6-11-18 CHB.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 648.42 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
648.42 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2854930
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 56
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 49
social impact