Ongoing socio-economic and climatic changes can differentially affect the biogeochemistry of the key nutrients nitrogen (N), silica (Si), and phosphorus (P) by altering their soil budgets, their transfer to aquatic environments and their ecological stoichiometry. This may lead to cascade consequences for aquatic communities and biogeochemical processes. Soil budgets, river export, and N, Si, and P ecological stoichiometry were assessed in a heavy impacted basin (Mincio River, Italy) in two decades (1991–2000; 2001–2010). The main aim was to analyse element-specific mechanisms of terrestrial-aquatic transport and retention within aquatic habitats. Budget results suggest a net accumulation (inputs exceeding outputs) of all nutrients in agricultural lands, mainly due to livestock manure, with a reduction for N (196 kg N ha−1year−1in 2000, and 132 kg N ha−1year−1in 2010), and constant values for Si (up to 3 kg Si ha−1year−1) and P (43 kg P ha−1year−1) along the study period. River export of N and P accounted for 3–27% and ~ 2% of N and P soil net accumulation, respectively, while Si export was significantly greater (25 kg Si ha−1year−1) than Si net accumulation on farmlands. The stoichiometry of net nutrient accumulation in soils was not reflected by the stoichiometry of nutrient riverine export, due to element-specific mechanisms. We speculate that N and Si vertical and horizontal mobilization is increased by the irrigation loop, while P retention is favored by limited erosion due to limited slopes in the Mincio River basin. The simultaneous analysis of N, Si and P allows us to better understand the different paths, transformation and retention mechanisms at the watershed scale.

Soil system budgets of N, Si and P in an agricultural irrigated watershed: surplus, differential export and underlying mechanisms / Pinardi, Monica; Soana, Elisa; Laini, Alex; Bresciani, Mariano; Bartoli, Marco. - In: BIOGEOCHEMISTRY. - ISSN 0168-2563. - 140:2(2018), pp. 175-197. [10.1007/s10533-018-0484-4]

Soil system budgets of N, Si and P in an agricultural irrigated watershed: surplus, differential export and underlying mechanisms

Pinardi, Monica;Soana, Elisa;Laini, Alex;Bartoli, Marco
2018

Abstract

Ongoing socio-economic and climatic changes can differentially affect the biogeochemistry of the key nutrients nitrogen (N), silica (Si), and phosphorus (P) by altering their soil budgets, their transfer to aquatic environments and their ecological stoichiometry. This may lead to cascade consequences for aquatic communities and biogeochemical processes. Soil budgets, river export, and N, Si, and P ecological stoichiometry were assessed in a heavy impacted basin (Mincio River, Italy) in two decades (1991–2000; 2001–2010). The main aim was to analyse element-specific mechanisms of terrestrial-aquatic transport and retention within aquatic habitats. Budget results suggest a net accumulation (inputs exceeding outputs) of all nutrients in agricultural lands, mainly due to livestock manure, with a reduction for N (196 kg N ha−1year−1in 2000, and 132 kg N ha−1year−1in 2010), and constant values for Si (up to 3 kg Si ha−1year−1) and P (43 kg P ha−1year−1) along the study period. River export of N and P accounted for 3–27% and ~ 2% of N and P soil net accumulation, respectively, while Si export was significantly greater (25 kg Si ha−1year−1) than Si net accumulation on farmlands. The stoichiometry of net nutrient accumulation in soils was not reflected by the stoichiometry of nutrient riverine export, due to element-specific mechanisms. We speculate that N and Si vertical and horizontal mobilization is increased by the irrigation loop, while P retention is favored by limited erosion due to limited slopes in the Mincio River basin. The simultaneous analysis of N, Si and P allows us to better understand the different paths, transformation and retention mechanisms at the watershed scale.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2849967
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