Background: Bowel dilatation is a common adaptive mechanism after intestinal resection. The symptomatic dilated dysmotile duodenum is difficult to manage, since conventional bowel tailoring and lengthening techniques are potentially hazardous because of the anatomy of the duodenal blood supply, the proximity to the pancreas, and the risk of injury to the common bile duct. Methods: A 2-month-old child with short bowel and a symptomatic massively dilated duodenum was treated with a Transverse Flap Duodenoplasty (TFD). The duodenum was opened longitudinally along its antimesenteric border preserving an intact strip of tissue overlying the pancreatic head. Three full thickness vascularized pedicle flaps were cut on both the anterior and posterior walls and were spirally rotated and sutured to create a uniform propulsive duodenum without diverticulae. Results: Healing was complicated by a soft anastomotic duodeno-ileal stenosis that resolved after three elective balloon dilatations. Oral feeding established rapidly. The child is growing, does not vomit, and passes 1–2 semiformed motions daily. Conclusions: TFD is a safe and versatile technique that preserves all duodenal absorptive mucosa and that removes any risk to the pancreas, bile duct, and ampulla of Vater. Our experience, although limited, has been encouraging and leads us to suggest TFD for the management of the difficult symptomatic dysmotile dilated duodenum.

Transverse flap duodenoplasty (TFD): a new technique in autologous bowel reconstructive surgery / Alberti, Daniele; Righetti, Laura; Bianchi, Adrian; De’Angelis, Gian Luigi; Boroni, Giovanni. - In: PEDIATRIC SURGERY INTERNATIONAL. - ISSN 0179-0358. - (2018), pp. 1-567. [10.1007/s00383-018-4245-1]

Transverse flap duodenoplasty (TFD): a new technique in autologous bowel reconstructive surgery

de’Angelis, Gian Luigi;
2018

Abstract

Background: Bowel dilatation is a common adaptive mechanism after intestinal resection. The symptomatic dilated dysmotile duodenum is difficult to manage, since conventional bowel tailoring and lengthening techniques are potentially hazardous because of the anatomy of the duodenal blood supply, the proximity to the pancreas, and the risk of injury to the common bile duct. Methods: A 2-month-old child with short bowel and a symptomatic massively dilated duodenum was treated with a Transverse Flap Duodenoplasty (TFD). The duodenum was opened longitudinally along its antimesenteric border preserving an intact strip of tissue overlying the pancreatic head. Three full thickness vascularized pedicle flaps were cut on both the anterior and posterior walls and were spirally rotated and sutured to create a uniform propulsive duodenum without diverticulae. Results: Healing was complicated by a soft anastomotic duodeno-ileal stenosis that resolved after three elective balloon dilatations. Oral feeding established rapidly. The child is growing, does not vomit, and passes 1–2 semiformed motions daily. Conclusions: TFD is a safe and versatile technique that preserves all duodenal absorptive mucosa and that removes any risk to the pancreas, bile duct, and ampulla of Vater. Our experience, although limited, has been encouraging and leads us to suggest TFD for the management of the difficult symptomatic dysmotile dilated duodenum.
Transverse flap duodenoplasty (TFD): a new technique in autologous bowel reconstructive surgery / Alberti, Daniele; Righetti, Laura; Bianchi, Adrian; De’Angelis, Gian Luigi; Boroni, Giovanni. - In: PEDIATRIC SURGERY INTERNATIONAL. - ISSN 0179-0358. - (2018), pp. 1-567. [10.1007/s00383-018-4245-1]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2841621
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