Introduction: Adipose grafting has undergone significant changes over time. Many different techniques have been followed by trying to improve the quality of the lipoaspirate and the survival of the fat graft after implantation. Material and methods: The purpose of this review is to analyse the historical evolution of the surgical harvesting and implant technique, describing the changes that have brought significant improvements, revolutionizing the aesthetic and functional results obtainable. Results: A standard fat grafting technique is commonly performed in three stages: harvesting of adipose tissue from a suitable donor site; processing of the lipoaspirate to eliminate cellular debris, acellular oil and excess of infiltrated solution, reinjection of the purified adipose tissue. The most widely used surgical technique was described by Coleman. He modified and corrected the methods and results of his predecessors and proposed an atraumatic protocol for the treatment of adipose tissue. He reported that the key to successful fat grafting lies in the technique. In addition, he noticed that adipose tissue was not only a good filler, but improved the quality of the skin. In fact, fat grafts demonstrated to have not only dermal filler properties but also regenerative potential owing to the presence of stem cells in fat tissue. Conclusion: Adipose tissue, actually, is the closest to the ideal filler because it is readily available; easily obtainable, with low donor-site morbidity; repeatable; inexpensive; versatile; and biocompatible. There is an abundance of literature supporting the efficacy of fat grafting in both aesthetic and reconstructive cases. Recent studies have shown the utility of adipose-derived stem cells in the improvement of wound healing, describing their ability to regenerate soft tissues and their remodelling capacity provided by their unique cytokine and growth factor profiles. Despite ongoing concerns about survival and longevity of fat grafts after implantation and unpredictability of long-term outcome, fat has been successfully used as a filler in many differ clinic situation.

The science behind autologous fat grafting / Bellini, Elisa; Grieco, Michele P.; Raposio, Edoardo. - In: ANNALS OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. - ISSN 2049-0801. - 24:(2017), pp. 65-73. [10.1016/j.amsu.2017.11.001]

The science behind autologous fat grafting

Bellini, Elisa;Grieco, Michele P.;Raposio, Edoardo
2017-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: Adipose grafting has undergone significant changes over time. Many different techniques have been followed by trying to improve the quality of the lipoaspirate and the survival of the fat graft after implantation. Material and methods: The purpose of this review is to analyse the historical evolution of the surgical harvesting and implant technique, describing the changes that have brought significant improvements, revolutionizing the aesthetic and functional results obtainable. Results: A standard fat grafting technique is commonly performed in three stages: harvesting of adipose tissue from a suitable donor site; processing of the lipoaspirate to eliminate cellular debris, acellular oil and excess of infiltrated solution, reinjection of the purified adipose tissue. The most widely used surgical technique was described by Coleman. He modified and corrected the methods and results of his predecessors and proposed an atraumatic protocol for the treatment of adipose tissue. He reported that the key to successful fat grafting lies in the technique. In addition, he noticed that adipose tissue was not only a good filler, but improved the quality of the skin. In fact, fat grafts demonstrated to have not only dermal filler properties but also regenerative potential owing to the presence of stem cells in fat tissue. Conclusion: Adipose tissue, actually, is the closest to the ideal filler because it is readily available; easily obtainable, with low donor-site morbidity; repeatable; inexpensive; versatile; and biocompatible. There is an abundance of literature supporting the efficacy of fat grafting in both aesthetic and reconstructive cases. Recent studies have shown the utility of adipose-derived stem cells in the improvement of wound healing, describing their ability to regenerate soft tissues and their remodelling capacity provided by their unique cytokine and growth factor profiles. Despite ongoing concerns about survival and longevity of fat grafts after implantation and unpredictability of long-term outcome, fat has been successfully used as a filler in many differ clinic situation.
2017
The science behind autologous fat grafting / Bellini, Elisa; Grieco, Michele P.; Raposio, Edoardo. - In: ANNALS OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. - ISSN 2049-0801. - 24:(2017), pp. 65-73. [10.1016/j.amsu.2017.11.001]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2835403
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