Functional constipation (FC) is a gastrointestinal disorder with a high prevalence among the general population. The precise causes of FC are still unknown and are most likely multifactorial. Growing evidence indicates that alterations of gut microbiota composition contribute to constipation symptoms. Nevertheless, many discrepancies exist in literature and no clear link between FC and gut microbiota composition has as yet been identified. In this study, we performed 16 S rRNA-based microbial profiling analysis of 147 stool samples from 68 FC individuals and compared their microbial profiles with those of 79 healthy subjects (HS). Notably, the gut microbiota of FC individuals was shown to be depleted of members belonging to Bacteroides, Roseburia and Coprococcus 3. Furthermore, the metabolic capabilities of the gut microbiomes of five FC and five HS individuals were evaluated through shotgun metagenomics using a MiSeq platform, indicating that HS are enriched in pathways involved in carbohydrate, fatty acid and lipid metabolism as compared to FC. In contrast, the microbiomes corresponding to FC were shown to exhibit high abundance of genes involved in hydrogen production, methanogenesis and glycerol degradation. The identified differences in bacterial composition and metabolic capabilities may play an important role in development of FC symptoms.

Unveiling the gut microbiota composition and functionality associated with constipation through metagenomic analyses / Mancabelli, Leonardo; Milani, Christian; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Turroni, Francesca; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Ticinesi, Andrea; Nouvenne, Antonio; Meschi, Tiziana; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 7:1(2017), p. 9879. [10.1038/s41598-017-10663-w]

Unveiling the gut microbiota composition and functionality associated with constipation through metagenomic analyses

MANCABELLI, Leonardo;MILANI, CHRISTIAN;LUGLI, Gabriele Andrea;TURRONI, FRANCESCA;MANGIFESTA, MARTA;TICINESI, Andrea;NOUVENNE, ANTONIO;MESCHI, Tiziana;VENTURA, Marco
2017-01-01

Abstract

Functional constipation (FC) is a gastrointestinal disorder with a high prevalence among the general population. The precise causes of FC are still unknown and are most likely multifactorial. Growing evidence indicates that alterations of gut microbiota composition contribute to constipation symptoms. Nevertheless, many discrepancies exist in literature and no clear link between FC and gut microbiota composition has as yet been identified. In this study, we performed 16 S rRNA-based microbial profiling analysis of 147 stool samples from 68 FC individuals and compared their microbial profiles with those of 79 healthy subjects (HS). Notably, the gut microbiota of FC individuals was shown to be depleted of members belonging to Bacteroides, Roseburia and Coprococcus 3. Furthermore, the metabolic capabilities of the gut microbiomes of five FC and five HS individuals were evaluated through shotgun metagenomics using a MiSeq platform, indicating that HS are enriched in pathways involved in carbohydrate, fatty acid and lipid metabolism as compared to FC. In contrast, the microbiomes corresponding to FC were shown to exhibit high abundance of genes involved in hydrogen production, methanogenesis and glycerol degradation. The identified differences in bacterial composition and metabolic capabilities may play an important role in development of FC symptoms.
2017
Unveiling the gut microbiota composition and functionality associated with constipation through metagenomic analyses / Mancabelli, Leonardo; Milani, Christian; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Turroni, Francesca; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Ticinesi, Andrea; Nouvenne, Antonio; Meschi, Tiziana; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 7:1(2017), p. 9879. [10.1038/s41598-017-10663-w]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2829612
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