The comparative effectiveness of fingolimod versus interferon beta/glatiramer acetate was assessed in a multicentre, observational, prospectively acquired cohort study including 613 patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis discontinuing natalizumab in the Italian iMedWeb registry. First, after natalizumab suspension, the relapse risk during the untreated wash-out period and during the course of switch therapies was estimated through Poisson regression analyses in separated models. During the wash-out period an increased risk of relapses was found in patients with a higher number of relapses before natalizumab treatment (incidence rate ratio = 1.31, P = 0.0014) and in patients discontinuing natalizumab due to lack of efficacy (incidence rate ratio = 2.33, P = 0.0288), patient's choice (incidence rate ratio = 2.18, P = 0.0064) and adverse events (incidence rate ratio = 2.09, P = 0.0084). The strongest independent factors influencing the relapse risk after the start of switch therapies were a wash-out duration longer than 3 months (incidence rate ratio = 1.78, P < 0.0001), the number of relapses experienced during and before natalizumab treatment (incidence rate ratio = 1.61, P < 0.0001; incidence rate ratio = 1.13, P = 0.0118, respectively) and the presence of comorbidities (incidence rate ratio = 1.4, P = 0.0097). Switching to fingolimod was associated with a 64% reduction of the adjusted-risk for relapse in comparison with switching to interferon beta/glatiramer acetate (incidence rate ratio = 0.36, P < 0.0001). Secondly, patients who switched to fingolimod or to interferon beta/glatiramer acetate were propensity score-matched on a 1-to-1 basis at the switching date. In the propensity score-matched sample a Poisson model showed a significant lower incidence of relapses in patients treated with fingolimod in comparison with those treated with interferon beta/glatiramer acetate (incidence rate ratio = 0.52, P = 0.0003) during a 12-month follow-up. The cumulative probability of a first relapse after the treatment switch was significantly lower in patients receiving fingolimod than in those receiving interferon beta/glatiramer acetate (P = 0.028). The robustness of this result was also confirmed by sensitivity analyses in subgroups with different wash-out durations (less or more than 3 months). Time to 3-month confirmed disability progression was not significantly different between the two groups (Hazard ratio = 0.58; P = 0.1931). Our results indicate a superiority of fingolimod in comparison to interferon beta/glatiramer acetate in controlling disease reactivation after natalizumab discontinuation in the real life setting.

Fingolimod versus interferon beta/glatiramer acetate after natalizumab suspension in multiple sclerosis / Iaffaldano, Pietro; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Pozzilli, Carlo; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo; Ghezzi, Angelo; Millefiorini, Enrico; Patti, Francesco; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Zimatore, Giovanni Bosco; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Amato, Maria Pia; Bertolotto, Antonio; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Granella, Franco; Coniglio, Gabriella; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Sola, Patrizia; Lus, Giacomo; Ferrò, Maria Teresa; Iuliano, Gerardo; Corea, Francesco; Protti, Alessandra; Cavalla, Paola; Guareschi, Angelica; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Paolicelli, Damiano; Tortorella, Carla; Lepore, Vito; Prosperini, Luca; Saccà, Francesco; Baroncini, Damiano; Comi, Giancarlo; Trojano, Maria. - In: BRAIN. - ISSN 0006-8950. - 138:11(2015), pp. 3275-3286. [10.1093/brain/awv260]

Fingolimod versus interferon beta/glatiramer acetate after natalizumab suspension in multiple sclerosis

GRANELLA, Franco;
2015

Abstract

The comparative effectiveness of fingolimod versus interferon beta/glatiramer acetate was assessed in a multicentre, observational, prospectively acquired cohort study including 613 patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis discontinuing natalizumab in the Italian iMedWeb registry. First, after natalizumab suspension, the relapse risk during the untreated wash-out period and during the course of switch therapies was estimated through Poisson regression analyses in separated models. During the wash-out period an increased risk of relapses was found in patients with a higher number of relapses before natalizumab treatment (incidence rate ratio = 1.31, P = 0.0014) and in patients discontinuing natalizumab due to lack of efficacy (incidence rate ratio = 2.33, P = 0.0288), patient's choice (incidence rate ratio = 2.18, P = 0.0064) and adverse events (incidence rate ratio = 2.09, P = 0.0084). The strongest independent factors influencing the relapse risk after the start of switch therapies were a wash-out duration longer than 3 months (incidence rate ratio = 1.78, P < 0.0001), the number of relapses experienced during and before natalizumab treatment (incidence rate ratio = 1.61, P < 0.0001; incidence rate ratio = 1.13, P = 0.0118, respectively) and the presence of comorbidities (incidence rate ratio = 1.4, P = 0.0097). Switching to fingolimod was associated with a 64% reduction of the adjusted-risk for relapse in comparison with switching to interferon beta/glatiramer acetate (incidence rate ratio = 0.36, P < 0.0001). Secondly, patients who switched to fingolimod or to interferon beta/glatiramer acetate were propensity score-matched on a 1-to-1 basis at the switching date. In the propensity score-matched sample a Poisson model showed a significant lower incidence of relapses in patients treated with fingolimod in comparison with those treated with interferon beta/glatiramer acetate (incidence rate ratio = 0.52, P = 0.0003) during a 12-month follow-up. The cumulative probability of a first relapse after the treatment switch was significantly lower in patients receiving fingolimod than in those receiving interferon beta/glatiramer acetate (P = 0.028). The robustness of this result was also confirmed by sensitivity analyses in subgroups with different wash-out durations (less or more than 3 months). Time to 3-month confirmed disability progression was not significantly different between the two groups (Hazard ratio = 0.58; P = 0.1931). Our results indicate a superiority of fingolimod in comparison to interferon beta/glatiramer acetate in controlling disease reactivation after natalizumab discontinuation in the real life setting.
Fingolimod versus interferon beta/glatiramer acetate after natalizumab suspension in multiple sclerosis / Iaffaldano, Pietro; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Pozzilli, Carlo; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo; Ghezzi, Angelo; Millefiorini, Enrico; Patti, Francesco; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Zimatore, Giovanni Bosco; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Amato, Maria Pia; Bertolotto, Antonio; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Granella, Franco; Coniglio, Gabriella; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Sola, Patrizia; Lus, Giacomo; Ferrò, Maria Teresa; Iuliano, Gerardo; Corea, Francesco; Protti, Alessandra; Cavalla, Paola; Guareschi, Angelica; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Paolicelli, Damiano; Tortorella, Carla; Lepore, Vito; Prosperini, Luca; Saccà, Francesco; Baroncini, Damiano; Comi, Giancarlo; Trojano, Maria. - In: BRAIN. - ISSN 0006-8950. - 138:11(2015), pp. 3275-3286. [10.1093/brain/awv260]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2810052
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 68
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 51
social impact