The early high condylectomy (HC), removing the overgrowing area of the condyle, may be indicated for condylar hyperplasia. However, in young patients, when the HC removes the pathological overgrowing tissue the contralateral condyle is still growing. May this surgical procedure, in these growing patients, stop the operated side growth creating the conditions for an opposite asymmetry? Authors investigate the way the operated mandible develops after the early HC, both as a symmetry percentage and in an absolute value related to the unaffected side. A sample of 8 consecutive growing patients, 1 male and 7 females, referred to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of Parma University for HC were investigated. Patients were longitudinally studied with 3 orthopantomographies at: T0 (diagnosis: mean age, 13 years; range, 11 years 2 months to 13 years 8 months), T1 (after surgery: mean age, 15; range, 13-18 years) and T2 (follow-up: mean age, 18 years; range, 17-20 years). The x-ray is used to study the condyle, ramus, and total vertical structures length by Mattila tracing method. The data were analyzed by the Student t test and Wilcoxon matched pairs test; P value was set at 0.5. The operated side was overcorrected by HC and; during the investigated period, its growth decreased from T0 to T1 and restarted from T1 to T2. The whole T0-T2 growth of the operated side was not statistically different from the one of the healthy side (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the operated side growth may continue in a more normal way after condylectomy.

How does the mandible grow after early high condylectomy? / Di Blasio, Chiara; Di Blasio, Alberto; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe; Anghinoni, Marilena; Sesenna, Enrico. - In: THE JOURNAL OF CRANIOFACIAL SURGERY. - ISSN 1536-3732. - 26:3(2015), pp. 764-771. [10.1097/SCS.0000000000001515]

How does the mandible grow after early high condylectomy?

DI BLASIO, Chiara;DI BLASIO, Alberto;PEDRAZZI, Giuseppe;SESENNA, Enrico
2015

Abstract

The early high condylectomy (HC), removing the overgrowing area of the condyle, may be indicated for condylar hyperplasia. However, in young patients, when the HC removes the pathological overgrowing tissue the contralateral condyle is still growing. May this surgical procedure, in these growing patients, stop the operated side growth creating the conditions for an opposite asymmetry? Authors investigate the way the operated mandible develops after the early HC, both as a symmetry percentage and in an absolute value related to the unaffected side. A sample of 8 consecutive growing patients, 1 male and 7 females, referred to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of Parma University for HC were investigated. Patients were longitudinally studied with 3 orthopantomographies at: T0 (diagnosis: mean age, 13 years; range, 11 years 2 months to 13 years 8 months), T1 (after surgery: mean age, 15; range, 13-18 years) and T2 (follow-up: mean age, 18 years; range, 17-20 years). The x-ray is used to study the condyle, ramus, and total vertical structures length by Mattila tracing method. The data were analyzed by the Student t test and Wilcoxon matched pairs test; P value was set at 0.5. The operated side was overcorrected by HC and; during the investigated period, its growth decreased from T0 to T1 and restarted from T1 to T2. The whole T0-T2 growth of the operated side was not statistically different from the one of the healthy side (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the operated side growth may continue in a more normal way after condylectomy.
How does the mandible grow after early high condylectomy? / Di Blasio, Chiara; Di Blasio, Alberto; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe; Anghinoni, Marilena; Sesenna, Enrico. - In: THE JOURNAL OF CRANIOFACIAL SURGERY. - ISSN 1536-3732. - 26:3(2015), pp. 764-771. [10.1097/SCS.0000000000001515]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2808227
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