Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), used for decades as flame retardants, have become widespread environmental contaminants. Exposure is believed to occur primarily through diet and dust, and infants and toddlers have the highest body burden, raising concern for potential developmental neurotoxicity. The exact mechanisms of PBDE neurotoxicity have not been elucidated, but two relevant modes of action relate to impairment of thyroid hormone homeostasis and to direct effects on brain cells causing alterations in signal transduction, oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. The present study shows that BDE-47 (2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether) induces oxidative stress and ensuing apoptotic cell death in mouse cerebellar granule neurons in vitro. Similarly, in vivo administration of BDE-47, according to an exposure protocol shown to induce behavioral and biochemical alterations (10. mg/kg, per os on post-natal day 10), induces oxidative stress and apoptosis, without altering serum levels of thyroid hormones. The effects of BDE-47 both in vitro and in vivo were more pronounced in a mouse model lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM) which results in reduced anti-oxidant capability due to low levels of GSH. Concentrations of BDE-47 in brain were in the mid-nanomolar range. These findings indicate that effects observed with BDE-47 in vitro are also present after in vivo administration, suggesting that in addition to potential endocrine effects, which were not seen here, direct interactions with brain cells should be considered as a potential mechanism of BDE-47 neurotoxicity.

The brominated flame retardant BDE-47 causes oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo in mice / Costa, Lucio G.; Pellacani, Claudia; Dao, Khoi; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Roque, Pamela J.. - In: NEUROTOXICOLOGY. - ISSN 0161-813X. - 48(2015), pp. 68-76. [10.1016/j.neuro.2015.03.008]

The brominated flame retardant BDE-47 causes oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo in mice

COSTA, Lucio Guido;PELLACANI, Claudia;
2015

Abstract

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), used for decades as flame retardants, have become widespread environmental contaminants. Exposure is believed to occur primarily through diet and dust, and infants and toddlers have the highest body burden, raising concern for potential developmental neurotoxicity. The exact mechanisms of PBDE neurotoxicity have not been elucidated, but two relevant modes of action relate to impairment of thyroid hormone homeostasis and to direct effects on brain cells causing alterations in signal transduction, oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. The present study shows that BDE-47 (2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether) induces oxidative stress and ensuing apoptotic cell death in mouse cerebellar granule neurons in vitro. Similarly, in vivo administration of BDE-47, according to an exposure protocol shown to induce behavioral and biochemical alterations (10. mg/kg, per os on post-natal day 10), induces oxidative stress and apoptosis, without altering serum levels of thyroid hormones. The effects of BDE-47 both in vitro and in vivo were more pronounced in a mouse model lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM) which results in reduced anti-oxidant capability due to low levels of GSH. Concentrations of BDE-47 in brain were in the mid-nanomolar range. These findings indicate that effects observed with BDE-47 in vitro are also present after in vivo administration, suggesting that in addition to potential endocrine effects, which were not seen here, direct interactions with brain cells should be considered as a potential mechanism of BDE-47 neurotoxicity.
The brominated flame retardant BDE-47 causes oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo in mice / Costa, Lucio G.; Pellacani, Claudia; Dao, Khoi; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Roque, Pamela J.. - In: NEUROTOXICOLOGY. - ISSN 0161-813X. - 48(2015), pp. 68-76. [10.1016/j.neuro.2015.03.008]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2807907
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