In spatial compatibility and Simon tasks, the response is faster when stimulus and response locations are on the same side than when they are on opposite sides. It has been shown that a spatial incompatible practice leads to a subsequent modulation of the Simon effect along the horizontal dimension. It has also been reported that this modulation occurs both along and across vertical and horizontal dimensions, but only after intensive incompatible training (600 trials). In this work, we show that this modulatory effect can be obtained with a smaller number of incompatible trials, changing the spatial arrangement of the vertical response keys to obtain a stronger dimensional overlap between the spatial codes of stimuli and response keys. The results of Experiment 1 showed that 80 incompatible vertical trials abolished the Simon effect in the same dimension. Experiment 2 showed that a modulation of the vertical Simon effect could be obtained after 80 horizontal incompatible trials. Experiment 3 explored whether the transfer effect can also occur in a horizontal Simon task after a brief vertical spatial incompatibility task, and results were similar to the previous experiments. In conclusion, we suggest that the spatial arrangement between response key and stimulus locations may be critical to establish the short-term memory links that enable the transfer of learning between brief incompatible practices and the Simon effects, both along the vertical dimension and across vertical and horizontal dimensions.

Influence of short incompatible practice on the Simon effect: transfer along the vertical dimension and across vertical and horizontal dimensions / Conde, Erick F. Q; Fraga-Filho, Roberto Sena; Lameira, Allan Pablo; Mograbi, Daniel C.; Riggio, Lucia; Gawryszewski, Luiz G.. - In: EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH. - ISSN 0014-4819. - 233:11(2015), pp. 3313-3321. [10.1007/s00221-015-4399-1]

Influence of short incompatible practice on the Simon effect: transfer along the vertical dimension and across vertical and horizontal dimensions

RIGGIO, Lucia;
2015

Abstract

In spatial compatibility and Simon tasks, the response is faster when stimulus and response locations are on the same side than when they are on opposite sides. It has been shown that a spatial incompatible practice leads to a subsequent modulation of the Simon effect along the horizontal dimension. It has also been reported that this modulation occurs both along and across vertical and horizontal dimensions, but only after intensive incompatible training (600 trials). In this work, we show that this modulatory effect can be obtained with a smaller number of incompatible trials, changing the spatial arrangement of the vertical response keys to obtain a stronger dimensional overlap between the spatial codes of stimuli and response keys. The results of Experiment 1 showed that 80 incompatible vertical trials abolished the Simon effect in the same dimension. Experiment 2 showed that a modulation of the vertical Simon effect could be obtained after 80 horizontal incompatible trials. Experiment 3 explored whether the transfer effect can also occur in a horizontal Simon task after a brief vertical spatial incompatibility task, and results were similar to the previous experiments. In conclusion, we suggest that the spatial arrangement between response key and stimulus locations may be critical to establish the short-term memory links that enable the transfer of learning between brief incompatible practices and the Simon effects, both along the vertical dimension and across vertical and horizontal dimensions.
Influence of short incompatible practice on the Simon effect: transfer along the vertical dimension and across vertical and horizontal dimensions / Conde, Erick F. Q; Fraga-Filho, Roberto Sena; Lameira, Allan Pablo; Mograbi, Daniel C.; Riggio, Lucia; Gawryszewski, Luiz G.. - In: EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH. - ISSN 0014-4819. - 233:11(2015), pp. 3313-3321. [10.1007/s00221-015-4399-1]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2798321
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