Research on nicotine dependence has had mixed success in identifying variables which can be used to guide treatment and enhance outcome. Personality is one of factors that have been related to the initiation, maintenance and cessation of smoking. This paper aims to analyze relationships between temperamental dimensions, depressive and anxiety symptoms, nicotine dependence and cessation success following different treatment (bupropion vs. varenicline). In order to retrospectively investigate the ability of Novelty Seeking (NS), Reward Dependence (RD), Harm Avoidance (HA) and smoking behavior to predict outcomes following pharmacological treatment, we carried out a clinical trial with a total of 162 participants. Subjects are administered with TCI-R, SAS and BDI questionnaires. Nicotine Dependence (ND) and Nicotine Use (CPD) were measured with the Fagerström Test for the Nicotine Dependence (FTND). At post-treatment (3 months) and 12-months follow-up tobacco cessation was measured through self-report and expired air carbon monoxide (CO) test. Results indicated that low level of FTND and Self-Transcendence mildly predicted outcomes. Treatment was not a significant predictor of abstinence. Even if gender not predicted abstinence, women showed a greater difficulty to quit smoking. Findings are discussed in relation to previous studies focusing on theoretical and measurement issues related to dispositional and biological factors.

Personality dimensions, smoking behavior, and drug effects on nicotine dependence: evidence for predicting tobacco withdrawal / Pino, Olimpia; Giucastro, Giuliano; Pelosi, Annalisa. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE. - ISSN 2333-2743. - 3:2(2015), pp. 17-24. [10.13189/ijnbs.2015.030202]

Personality dimensions, smoking behavior, and drug effects on nicotine dependence: evidence for predicting tobacco withdrawal

PINO, Olimpia;PELOSI, Annalisa
2015

Abstract

Research on nicotine dependence has had mixed success in identifying variables which can be used to guide treatment and enhance outcome. Personality is one of factors that have been related to the initiation, maintenance and cessation of smoking. This paper aims to analyze relationships between temperamental dimensions, depressive and anxiety symptoms, nicotine dependence and cessation success following different treatment (bupropion vs. varenicline). In order to retrospectively investigate the ability of Novelty Seeking (NS), Reward Dependence (RD), Harm Avoidance (HA) and smoking behavior to predict outcomes following pharmacological treatment, we carried out a clinical trial with a total of 162 participants. Subjects are administered with TCI-R, SAS and BDI questionnaires. Nicotine Dependence (ND) and Nicotine Use (CPD) were measured with the Fagerström Test for the Nicotine Dependence (FTND). At post-treatment (3 months) and 12-months follow-up tobacco cessation was measured through self-report and expired air carbon monoxide (CO) test. Results indicated that low level of FTND and Self-Transcendence mildly predicted outcomes. Treatment was not a significant predictor of abstinence. Even if gender not predicted abstinence, women showed a greater difficulty to quit smoking. Findings are discussed in relation to previous studies focusing on theoretical and measurement issues related to dispositional and biological factors.
Personality dimensions, smoking behavior, and drug effects on nicotine dependence: evidence for predicting tobacco withdrawal / Pino, Olimpia; Giucastro, Giuliano; Pelosi, Annalisa. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE. - ISSN 2333-2743. - 3:2(2015), pp. 17-24. [10.13189/ijnbs.2015.030202]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/2796624
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