Salmonella Choleraesuis causes a systemic disease in pigs responsible of economic problems for farmers (Ku et al. 2005). Salmonella Typhimurium is the second important serovar, diagnosed in pig farms and is the principal responsible of salmonellosis in humans as a consequence of consumption of contaminated pork products (EFSA Journal, 2010). Vaccination is a decisive tool to control disease in countries with high prevalence of infection (Wales et al., 2011), unfortunately different serovars affect pigs and the cross-protection of available vaccines is not completely disclosed (Foss et al., 2013). S.Typhimurium ÎTznuABC is an atten- ˇ uated vaccine and recently we tested its safety and efficacy in mice and pigs experimentally infected with virulent S.Typhimurium (Pesciaroli et al. 2011; Gradassi, et al. 2013). The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of this attenuated vaccine, in comparison to an inactivated S.Choleraesuis vaccine, in piglets experimentally infected with S.Choleraesuis. Eighteen piglets were randomly divided in 3 groups. Group A was orally vaccinated with S.Typhimurium ÎTznuABC and boosted with inactivated S.Choleraesuis vaccine, ˇ group B was intramuscularly vaccinated with inactivated S.Choleraesuis vaccine and group C was unvaccinated. All groups were challenged with 5x108 CFU of virulent S.Choleraesuis at day 35 after vaccination. Animals were weighed at vaccination and before necropsy (day 47 from first vaccination). Tonsils, ileocecal lymph nodes, spleen, liver, intestinal content of ileum, cecum, colon and jejunum were collected during necropsy for microbiological analyses and gross lesions of organs were recorded. The results show that vaccination does not influence the weight gain; furthermore, the synergic action of attenuated vaccine followed by a boost with inactivated vaccine reduces fever, ileocecal lymph nodes and gut colonization caused by virulent S.Choleraesuis infection. Antibody titers of vaccinated groups (A and B) were statistically different from group C, indicating the capability of this new immunizing protocol in providing humoral response. These findings show that this new immunizing approach is more effective than the homologous inactivated vaccination protocol in controlling S.Choleraesuis infection.

EFFICACY OF AN IMMUNIZATION PROTOCOL BASED ON AN ATTENUATED SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM VACCINE BOOSTED WITH AN INACTIVATED SALMONELLA CHOLERAESUIS VACCINE IN PIGLETS EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED WITH S.CHOLERAESUIS / Jessica, Ruggeri; Michele, Pesciaroli; Nicola, Martinelli; Barbara, Chirullo; Maria Cristina, Ossiprandi; Attilio, Corradi; Paolo, Pasquali; Giovanni Loris, Alborali. - (2015), pp. 55-56.

EFFICACY OF AN IMMUNIZATION PROTOCOL BASED ON AN ATTENUATED SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM VACCINE BOOSTED WITH AN INACTIVATED SALMONELLA CHOLERAESUIS VACCINE IN PIGLETS EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED WITH S.CHOLERAESUIS

OSSIPRANDI, Maria Cristina;CORRADI, Attilio;
2015

Abstract

Salmonella Choleraesuis causes a systemic disease in pigs responsible of economic problems for farmers (Ku et al. 2005). Salmonella Typhimurium is the second important serovar, diagnosed in pig farms and is the principal responsible of salmonellosis in humans as a consequence of consumption of contaminated pork products (EFSA Journal, 2010). Vaccination is a decisive tool to control disease in countries with high prevalence of infection (Wales et al., 2011), unfortunately different serovars affect pigs and the cross-protection of available vaccines is not completely disclosed (Foss et al., 2013). S.Typhimurium ÎTznuABC is an atten- ˇ uated vaccine and recently we tested its safety and efficacy in mice and pigs experimentally infected with virulent S.Typhimurium (Pesciaroli et al. 2011; Gradassi, et al. 2013). The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of this attenuated vaccine, in comparison to an inactivated S.Choleraesuis vaccine, in piglets experimentally infected with S.Choleraesuis. Eighteen piglets were randomly divided in 3 groups. Group A was orally vaccinated with S.Typhimurium ÎTznuABC and boosted with inactivated S.Choleraesuis vaccine, ˇ group B was intramuscularly vaccinated with inactivated S.Choleraesuis vaccine and group C was unvaccinated. All groups were challenged with 5x108 CFU of virulent S.Choleraesuis at day 35 after vaccination. Animals were weighed at vaccination and before necropsy (day 47 from first vaccination). Tonsils, ileocecal lymph nodes, spleen, liver, intestinal content of ileum, cecum, colon and jejunum were collected during necropsy for microbiological analyses and gross lesions of organs were recorded. The results show that vaccination does not influence the weight gain; furthermore, the synergic action of attenuated vaccine followed by a boost with inactivated vaccine reduces fever, ileocecal lymph nodes and gut colonization caused by virulent S.Choleraesuis infection. Antibody titers of vaccinated groups (A and B) were statistically different from group C, indicating the capability of this new immunizing protocol in providing humoral response. These findings show that this new immunizing approach is more effective than the homologous inactivated vaccination protocol in controlling S.Choleraesuis infection.
978-88-909002-0-7
EFFICACY OF AN IMMUNIZATION PROTOCOL BASED ON AN ATTENUATED SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM VACCINE BOOSTED WITH AN INACTIVATED SALMONELLA CHOLERAESUIS VACCINE IN PIGLETS EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED WITH S.CHOLERAESUIS / Jessica, Ruggeri; Michele, Pesciaroli; Nicola, Martinelli; Barbara, Chirullo; Maria Cristina, Ossiprandi; Attilio, Corradi; Paolo, Pasquali; Giovanni Loris, Alborali. - (2015), pp. 55-56.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2792071
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