In snowbed habitats, characterized by a long-lasting snow cover, the timing of snowmelt can be included among the major factors controlling plant phenology. Nevertheless, only a few ecological studies have tested the responses of flowering phenology of species growing in very late snow-free habitats to an advanced snowmelt (AS) date. The aim of this study was to determine the impacts of an extremely earlier melt-out of snow on flowering phenology of vascular plant species inhabiting an alpine snowbed. The study was conducted in the high Gavia Valley (Italy, 2,700 m a.s.l.). On 30th May 2012, we removed manually the snow cover and set up an experiment with 5 AS and 5 control plots. Phenological observations of the most abundant vascular species were conducted every 4–6 days. Moreover, we calculated cumulative soil temperature and recorded the mortality of reproductive structures of three species. For several species flowering occurred earlier, and the prefloration period was extended in the AS treatment in comparison with the control. For the majority of species, cumulative soil temperatures in the AS treatment and the control were comparable, confirming that temperature exerts the main control on the flowering of the species inhabiting snowbeds. Earlier flowering species resulted more affected by an AS date in comparison with later flowering species. The mortality of reproductive structures did not increase in the AS treatments in comparison with the control suggesting that few and weak frost events in late spring do not affect the survival of reproductive structures of the species studied.

Responses of flowering phenology of snowbed plants to an experimentally imposed extreme advanced snowmelt / Petraglia, Alessandro; Tomaselli, Marcello; Matteo Petit, Bon; Nicola, Delnevo; Giorgio, Chiari; Carbognani, Michele. - In: PLANT ECOLOGY. - ISSN 1385-0237. - 215:(2014), pp. 759-768. [10.1007/s11258-014-0368-1]

Responses of flowering phenology of snowbed plants to an experimentally imposed extreme advanced snowmelt

PETRAGLIA, Alessandro;TOMASELLI, Marcello;CARBOGNANI, Michele
2014

Abstract

In snowbed habitats, characterized by a long-lasting snow cover, the timing of snowmelt can be included among the major factors controlling plant phenology. Nevertheless, only a few ecological studies have tested the responses of flowering phenology of species growing in very late snow-free habitats to an advanced snowmelt (AS) date. The aim of this study was to determine the impacts of an extremely earlier melt-out of snow on flowering phenology of vascular plant species inhabiting an alpine snowbed. The study was conducted in the high Gavia Valley (Italy, 2,700 m a.s.l.). On 30th May 2012, we removed manually the snow cover and set up an experiment with 5 AS and 5 control plots. Phenological observations of the most abundant vascular species were conducted every 4–6 days. Moreover, we calculated cumulative soil temperature and recorded the mortality of reproductive structures of three species. For several species flowering occurred earlier, and the prefloration period was extended in the AS treatment in comparison with the control. For the majority of species, cumulative soil temperatures in the AS treatment and the control were comparable, confirming that temperature exerts the main control on the flowering of the species inhabiting snowbeds. Earlier flowering species resulted more affected by an AS date in comparison with later flowering species. The mortality of reproductive structures did not increase in the AS treatments in comparison with the control suggesting that few and weak frost events in late spring do not affect the survival of reproductive structures of the species studied.
Responses of flowering phenology of snowbed plants to an experimentally imposed extreme advanced snowmelt / Petraglia, Alessandro; Tomaselli, Marcello; Matteo Petit, Bon; Nicola, Delnevo; Giorgio, Chiari; Carbognani, Michele. - In: PLANT ECOLOGY. - ISSN 1385-0237. - 215:(2014), pp. 759-768. [10.1007/s11258-014-0368-1]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2761383
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