Does the comprehension of both action-related and abstract verbs rely on motor simulation? In a behavioral experiment, in which a semantic task was used, response times to hand-action-related verbs were briefer than those to abstract verbs and both decreased with repetition of presentation. In a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) experiment, single-pulse stimulation was randomly delivered over hand motor area of the left primary motor cortex to measure cortical-spinal excitability at 300 or 500 ms after verb presentation. Two blocks of trials were run. In each block, the same verbs were randomly presented. In the first block, stimulation induced an increase in motor evoked potentials only when TMS was applied 300 ms after action-related verb presentation. In the second block, no modulation of motor cortex was found according to type of verb and stimulation-delay. These results confirm that motor simulation can be used to understand action rather than abstract verbs. Moreover, they suggest that with repetition, the semantic processing for action verbs does not require activation of primary motor cortex anymore.

Understanding of action-related verbs and abstract verbs in comparison: a behavioral and TMS study / Innocenti, Alessandro; DE STEFANI, Elisa; Sestito, Mariateresa; Gentilucci, Maurizio. - In: COGNITIVE PROCESSING. - ISSN 1612-4782. - (2013). [10.1007/s10339-013-0583-z]

Understanding of action-related verbs and abstract verbs in comparison: a behavioral and TMS study

INNOCENTI, ALESSANDRO;DE STEFANI, ELISA;SESTITO, MARIATERESA;GENTILUCCI, Maurizio
2013-01-01

Abstract

Does the comprehension of both action-related and abstract verbs rely on motor simulation? In a behavioral experiment, in which a semantic task was used, response times to hand-action-related verbs were briefer than those to abstract verbs and both decreased with repetition of presentation. In a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) experiment, single-pulse stimulation was randomly delivered over hand motor area of the left primary motor cortex to measure cortical-spinal excitability at 300 or 500 ms after verb presentation. Two blocks of trials were run. In each block, the same verbs were randomly presented. In the first block, stimulation induced an increase in motor evoked potentials only when TMS was applied 300 ms after action-related verb presentation. In the second block, no modulation of motor cortex was found according to type of verb and stimulation-delay. These results confirm that motor simulation can be used to understand action rather than abstract verbs. Moreover, they suggest that with repetition, the semantic processing for action verbs does not require activation of primary motor cortex anymore.
2013
Understanding of action-related verbs and abstract verbs in comparison: a behavioral and TMS study / Innocenti, Alessandro; DE STEFANI, Elisa; Sestito, Mariateresa; Gentilucci, Maurizio. - In: COGNITIVE PROCESSING. - ISSN 1612-4782. - (2013). [10.1007/s10339-013-0583-z]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2731904
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 32
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 27
social impact