The ability of spontaneous running to prevent carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia was studied in young, nonobese rats. Exercise-trained and sedentary rats were fed a diet consisting of (as percent total calories) 12% fat, 22% protein, and 66% carbohydrate. The source of the carbohydrate was varied, and experiments were carried out with sucrose and glucose as the sole dietary carbohydrate. Plasma triglyceride (TG) levels rose in response to both forms of dietary carbohydrate in both sedentary and exercise-trained rats, but the magnitude of the elevation was greatly attenuated in the exercise-trained group. Plasma insulin concentrations were also significantly lower in exercise-trained rats. Measurements of hepatic very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG secretion rate and adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity were made in an effort to determine how exercise-training prevented the development of carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia. The results of these studies indicated that perfused livers of exercise-trained rats secreted significantly less VLDL-TG, whereas adipose tissue LPL activity of the two groups was similar. On the basis of these results, it is postulated that the ability of exercise-training to inhibit carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia is due to an increase in insulin sensitivity resulting from chronic exercise. As a result, the postprandial insulin responses to high carbohydrate diets would be relatively reduced in exercise-trained rats, leading to decreased hepatic VLD-TG secretion, and lower plasma triglyceride concentrations.

Ability of exercise to inhibit carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia in rats / Zavaroni, Ivana; Chen, Yi; Mondon, Ce; Reaven, Gm. - In: METABOLISM, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL. - ISSN 0026-0495. - 30 (5):(1981), pp. 476-480.

Ability of exercise to inhibit carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia in rats

ZAVARONI, Ivana;
1981-01-01

Abstract

The ability of spontaneous running to prevent carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia was studied in young, nonobese rats. Exercise-trained and sedentary rats were fed a diet consisting of (as percent total calories) 12% fat, 22% protein, and 66% carbohydrate. The source of the carbohydrate was varied, and experiments were carried out with sucrose and glucose as the sole dietary carbohydrate. Plasma triglyceride (TG) levels rose in response to both forms of dietary carbohydrate in both sedentary and exercise-trained rats, but the magnitude of the elevation was greatly attenuated in the exercise-trained group. Plasma insulin concentrations were also significantly lower in exercise-trained rats. Measurements of hepatic very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG secretion rate and adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity were made in an effort to determine how exercise-training prevented the development of carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia. The results of these studies indicated that perfused livers of exercise-trained rats secreted significantly less VLDL-TG, whereas adipose tissue LPL activity of the two groups was similar. On the basis of these results, it is postulated that the ability of exercise-training to inhibit carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia is due to an increase in insulin sensitivity resulting from chronic exercise. As a result, the postprandial insulin responses to high carbohydrate diets would be relatively reduced in exercise-trained rats, leading to decreased hepatic VLD-TG secretion, and lower plasma triglyceride concentrations.
Ability of exercise to inhibit carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia in rats / Zavaroni, Ivana; Chen, Yi; Mondon, Ce; Reaven, Gm. - In: METABOLISM, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL. - ISSN 0026-0495. - 30 (5):(1981), pp. 476-480.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2437202
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