Recent discoveries suggest cysteine-stabilized toxins and antimicrobial peptides have structure-activity parallels derived by common ancestry. Here, human antimicrobial peptide hBD-2 and rattlesnake venom-toxin crotamine were compared in phylogeny, 3D structure, target cell specificity, and mechanisms of action. Results indicate a striking degree of structural and phylogenetic congruence. Importantly, these polypeptides also exhibited functional reciprocity: (i) they exerted highly similar antimicrobial pH optima and spectra; (ii) both altered membrane potential consistent with ion channel-perturbing activities; and (iii) both peptides induced phosphatidylserine accessibility in eukaryotic cells. However, the Nav channel-inhibitor tetrodotoxin antagonized hBD-2 mechanisms, but not those of crotamine. As crotamine targets eukaryotic ion channels, computational docking was used to compare hBD-2 versus crotamine interactions with prototypic bacterial, fungal, or mammalian K(v) channels. Models support direct interactions of each peptide with K(v) channels. However, while crotamine localized to occlude K(v) channels in eukaryotic but not prokaryotic cells, hBD-2 interacted with prokaryotic and eukaryotic K(v) channels but did not occlude either. Together, these results support the hypothesis that antimicrobial and cytotoxic polypeptides have ancestral structure-function homology, but evolved to preferentially target respective microbial versus mammalian ion channels via residue-specific interactions. These insights may accelerate development of anti-infective or therapeutic peptides that selectively target microbial or abnormal host cells.

Selective Reciprocity In Antimicrobial Activity Versus Cytotoxicity Of Hbd-2 And Crotamine / Yount, N. Y.; Kupferwasser, D; Spisni, Alberto; Dutz, S. M.; Ramjan, Z. H.; Sharma, S; Waring, A. J.; Yeaman, M. R.. - In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. - ISSN 0027-8424. - 106:(2009), pp. 14972-14977. [10.1073/pnas.0904465106]

Selective Reciprocity In Antimicrobial Activity Versus Cytotoxicity Of Hbd-2 And Crotamine

SPISNI, Alberto;
2009-01-01

Abstract

Recent discoveries suggest cysteine-stabilized toxins and antimicrobial peptides have structure-activity parallels derived by common ancestry. Here, human antimicrobial peptide hBD-2 and rattlesnake venom-toxin crotamine were compared in phylogeny, 3D structure, target cell specificity, and mechanisms of action. Results indicate a striking degree of structural and phylogenetic congruence. Importantly, these polypeptides also exhibited functional reciprocity: (i) they exerted highly similar antimicrobial pH optima and spectra; (ii) both altered membrane potential consistent with ion channel-perturbing activities; and (iii) both peptides induced phosphatidylserine accessibility in eukaryotic cells. However, the Nav channel-inhibitor tetrodotoxin antagonized hBD-2 mechanisms, but not those of crotamine. As crotamine targets eukaryotic ion channels, computational docking was used to compare hBD-2 versus crotamine interactions with prototypic bacterial, fungal, or mammalian K(v) channels. Models support direct interactions of each peptide with K(v) channels. However, while crotamine localized to occlude K(v) channels in eukaryotic but not prokaryotic cells, hBD-2 interacted with prokaryotic and eukaryotic K(v) channels but did not occlude either. Together, these results support the hypothesis that antimicrobial and cytotoxic polypeptides have ancestral structure-function homology, but evolved to preferentially target respective microbial versus mammalian ion channels via residue-specific interactions. These insights may accelerate development of anti-infective or therapeutic peptides that selectively target microbial or abnormal host cells.
2009
Selective Reciprocity In Antimicrobial Activity Versus Cytotoxicity Of Hbd-2 And Crotamine / Yount, N. Y.; Kupferwasser, D; Spisni, Alberto; Dutz, S. M.; Ramjan, Z. H.; Sharma, S; Waring, A. J.; Yeaman, M. R.. - In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. - ISSN 0027-8424. - 106:(2009), pp. 14972-14977. [10.1073/pnas.0904465106]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2286914
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