The glucose concentration (gl) in mammalian serum incorporates a normal range of variation of several millimoles. We studied the effects of such variations on light-evoked electrical signals in the in vitro arterially perfused cat eye, avoiding extraocular regulatory mechanisms that might confound data interpretation. Changes in gl from the nominal control value of 5 mmol/1 were maintained for 5-40 min. Stimuli of near rod threshold intensity were presented in full dark adaptation, and stimuli of higher intensity were presented in the presence of a white background for cone responses. We recorded the dc-electroretinogram (ERG), the scotopic threshold response (STR), the optic nerve response (ONR), and the transretinal slow P-III and transepithelial retinal pigment epithelium c-wave from the subreti- nal space. The ocular standing potential changed by up to ±2 mV in parallel with an increase and decrease in gl, independent of the adaptation condition. Our results show that the rod-ERG, STR, and rod-driven optic nerve response (ONR) have a marked sensitivity to small changes in gl (±1 to 3 mmol/1). The field potentials increased and decreased in parallel with changes in gl. The cone ERG and cone ONR, in contrast, failed to respond consistently to increases in gl and revealed decreases in amplitudes only with an extreme decrease in gl. Decrease in gl, down to 2 mmol/1 and less, is known to induce drastic behavioral and electrophysiologic phenomena in the central nervous system. Our results imply that the "normal" glucose level, at least in the cat, could be marginal for rod-mediated retinal function. The results also suggest a marked difference in metabolic mechanisms for cone versus rod photoreceptors

Changes in glucose level affect rod function more than cone function in the isolated, perfused cat eye / Macaluso, Claudio; Onoe, S.; Niemeyer, G.. - In: INVESTIGATIVE OPHTHALMOLOGY & VISUAL SCIENCE. - ISSN 0146-0404. - 33:(1992), pp. 2798-2808.

Changes in glucose level affect rod function more than cone function in the isolated, perfused cat eye

MACALUSO, Claudio;
1992

Abstract

The glucose concentration (gl) in mammalian serum incorporates a normal range of variation of several millimoles. We studied the effects of such variations on light-evoked electrical signals in the in vitro arterially perfused cat eye, avoiding extraocular regulatory mechanisms that might confound data interpretation. Changes in gl from the nominal control value of 5 mmol/1 were maintained for 5-40 min. Stimuli of near rod threshold intensity were presented in full dark adaptation, and stimuli of higher intensity were presented in the presence of a white background for cone responses. We recorded the dc-electroretinogram (ERG), the scotopic threshold response (STR), the optic nerve response (ONR), and the transretinal slow P-III and transepithelial retinal pigment epithelium c-wave from the subreti- nal space. The ocular standing potential changed by up to ±2 mV in parallel with an increase and decrease in gl, independent of the adaptation condition. Our results show that the rod-ERG, STR, and rod-driven optic nerve response (ONR) have a marked sensitivity to small changes in gl (±1 to 3 mmol/1). The field potentials increased and decreased in parallel with changes in gl. The cone ERG and cone ONR, in contrast, failed to respond consistently to increases in gl and revealed decreases in amplitudes only with an extreme decrease in gl. Decrease in gl, down to 2 mmol/1 and less, is known to induce drastic behavioral and electrophysiologic phenomena in the central nervous system. Our results imply that the "normal" glucose level, at least in the cat, could be marginal for rod-mediated retinal function. The results also suggest a marked difference in metabolic mechanisms for cone versus rod photoreceptors
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11381/1728684
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