The development of neural networks and brain automata has made neuroscientists aware that the performance limits of these brain-like devices lies, at least in part, in their computational power. The computational basis of a standard cybernetic design, in fact, refers to that of a discrete and finite state machine or Turing Machine (TM). In contrast, it has been suggested that a number of human cerebral activites, from feedback controls up to mental processes, rely on a mixing of both finitary, digital-like and infinitary, continuous- like procedures. Therefore, the central nervous system (CNS) of man would exploit a form of computation going beyond that of a TM. This "non conventional" computation has been called hybrid computation. Some basic structures for hybrid brain computation are believed to be the brain computational maps, in which both Turing-like (digital) computation and continuous (analog) forms of calculus might occur. The cerebral cortex and brain stem appears primary candidate for this processing. However, also neuroendocrine structures like the hypothalamus are believed to exhibit hybrid computional processes, and might give rise to computational maps. Current theories on neural activity, including wiring and volume transmission, neuronal group selection and dynamic evolving models of brain automata, bring fuel to the existence of natural hybrid computation, stressing a cooperation between discrete and continuous forms of communication in the CNS. In addition, the recent advent of neuromorphic chips, like those to restore activity in damaged retina and visual cortex, suggests that assumption of a discrete-continuum polarity in designing biocompatible neural circuitries is crucial for their ensuing performance. In these bionic structures, in fact, a correspondence exists between the original anatomical architecture and synthetic wiring of the chip, resulting in a correspondence between natural and cybernetic neural activity. Thus, chip "form" provides a continuum essential to chip "function". We conclude that it is reasonable to predict the existence of hybrid computational processes in the course of many human, brain integrating activities, urging development of cybernetic approaches based on this modelling for adequate reproduction of a variety of cerebral performances. (www.actabiomedica.it). © Mattioli 1885.

COMPUTATION AND BRAIN PROCESSES, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO NEUROENDOCRINE SYSTEMS / TONI R.; SPALETTA G; DELLA CASA C; RAVERA S; SANDRI G. - In: ACTA BIO-MEDICA DE L'ATENEO PARMENSE. - ISSN 0392-4203. - 78 (suppl 1):(2007), pp. 67-83.

COMPUTATION AND BRAIN PROCESSES, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO NEUROENDOCRINE SYSTEMS

TONI, Roberto;
2007

Abstract

The development of neural networks and brain automata has made neuroscientists aware that the performance limits of these brain-like devices lies, at least in part, in their computational power. The computational basis of a standard cybernetic design, in fact, refers to that of a discrete and finite state machine or Turing Machine (TM). In contrast, it has been suggested that a number of human cerebral activites, from feedback controls up to mental processes, rely on a mixing of both finitary, digital-like and infinitary, continuous- like procedures. Therefore, the central nervous system (CNS) of man would exploit a form of computation going beyond that of a TM. This "non conventional" computation has been called hybrid computation. Some basic structures for hybrid brain computation are believed to be the brain computational maps, in which both Turing-like (digital) computation and continuous (analog) forms of calculus might occur. The cerebral cortex and brain stem appears primary candidate for this processing. However, also neuroendocrine structures like the hypothalamus are believed to exhibit hybrid computional processes, and might give rise to computational maps. Current theories on neural activity, including wiring and volume transmission, neuronal group selection and dynamic evolving models of brain automata, bring fuel to the existence of natural hybrid computation, stressing a cooperation between discrete and continuous forms of communication in the CNS. In addition, the recent advent of neuromorphic chips, like those to restore activity in damaged retina and visual cortex, suggests that assumption of a discrete-continuum polarity in designing biocompatible neural circuitries is crucial for their ensuing performance. In these bionic structures, in fact, a correspondence exists between the original anatomical architecture and synthetic wiring of the chip, resulting in a correspondence between natural and cybernetic neural activity. Thus, chip "form" provides a continuum essential to chip "function". We conclude that it is reasonable to predict the existence of hybrid computational processes in the course of many human, brain integrating activities, urging development of cybernetic approaches based on this modelling for adequate reproduction of a variety of cerebral performances. (www.actabiomedica.it). © Mattioli 1885.
COMPUTATION AND BRAIN PROCESSES, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO NEUROENDOCRINE SYSTEMS / TONI R.; SPALETTA G; DELLA CASA C; RAVERA S; SANDRI G. - In: ACTA BIO-MEDICA DE L'ATENEO PARMENSE. - ISSN 0392-4203. - 78 (suppl 1):(2007), pp. 67-83.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/1509112
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