Illusions have been much studied in psychology and cognitive neuro- science. In addition, they continue to intrigue and amuse scientists and laymen. But what exactly are “illusions”? What is their use in the study of perception? Why are we fascinated by illusions? In this chapter I attempt to provide a novel answer to these questions. I will start by considering two extreme views, attempts to understand illusions by categorization, and the common sense view that illusions are perceptual mistakes. Next, I will propose a definition of illusions as perceptual inconsistencies. While this definition is based on phenomenological analysis, I suggest that it also has psycho-physical implications. By stud-ying the relationship between perceptual and stimulus inconsistency, we can learn a great deal about perception, not only about its intriguing inconsistencies that we call illusions, but also – and most importantly – about its adaptive function of providing us with a behaviorally useful representation of the external environment.

Illusions we should have (But don't) / Bruno, Nicola. - STAMPA. - (2012), pp. 44-58.

Illusions we should have (But don't)

BRUNO, Nicola
2012

Abstract

Illusions have been much studied in psychology and cognitive neuro- science. In addition, they continue to intrigue and amuse scientists and laymen. But what exactly are “illusions”? What is their use in the study of perception? Why are we fascinated by illusions? In this chapter I attempt to provide a novel answer to these questions. I will start by considering two extreme views, attempts to understand illusions by categorization, and the common sense view that illusions are perceptual mistakes. Next, I will propose a definition of illusions as perceptual inconsistencies. While this definition is based on phenomenological analysis, I suggest that it also has psycho-physical implications. By stud-ying the relationship between perceptual and stimulus inconsistency, we can learn a great deal about perception, not only about its intriguing inconsistencies that we call illusions, but also – and most importantly – about its adaptive function of providing us with a behaviorally useful representation of the external environment.
9780230347908
Illusions we should have (But don't) / Bruno, Nicola. - STAMPA. - (2012), pp. 44-58.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
illusions12.pdf

solo utenti autorizzati

Descrizione: pdf
Tipologia: Documento in Pre-print
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 480.78 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
480.78 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11381/2786076
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact